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Home » Marine Science

Marine Science

Recent “Triple-Dip” La Niña upends current understanding of ENSO 

With the current El Niño in full force, researchers are still puzzling over the 2020–2023 La Niña that upended current understanding of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) dynamics. The three consecutive years of La Niña conditions – a rare “triple-dip” phenomenon – had widespread impacts on the ocean and climate across the globe. While triple-dip La Niñas have happened before, this one was notable in that it did not conform to conventional theories on how these extended La Niñas develop, leaving scientists searching for clues to explain what caused it.

Recent “Triple-Dip” La Niña upends current understanding of ENSO  Read More >

Biden-Harris Administration announces $60 million funding opportunity to help create a Climate-Ready workforce as part of the Inflation Reduction Act

Today, the Department of Commerce’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) opened a competitive funding opportunity for the Climate Ready Workforce for Coastal States, Tribes, and Territories Initiative to connect people across the country to good-paying jobs, such as landscape technicians, heat health outreach specialists and climate equity officers, that tackle the climate crisis and boost local resilience. NOAA will invest $60 million total from the Inflation Reduction Act for the initiative — a $50 million competitive funding opportunity and $10 million for technical assistance to support applicants and grantees.

Biden-Harris Administration announces $60 million funding opportunity to help create a Climate-Ready workforce as part of the Inflation Reduction Act Read More >

Sunset view from underneath an airplane's wing

NOAA researchers fly out over the Pacific to investigate cloud-forming marine sulfur

While the shade offered by clouds on a hot sunny day can be obvious, quantifying the actual climate impact in terms of solar energy remains a challenging task. This is because the volume, thickness, and lifetime of marine clouds can change rapidly, and the processes that govern how and where clouds  form and how gases and aerosols in the air interact with cloud droplets are highly complex. In a marine environment, many of those gases and aerosols in the air come from the ocean itself. 

NOAA researchers fly out over the Pacific to investigate cloud-forming marine sulfur Read More >

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