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Climate Change

Kristen Schepel: Changing the climate for innovation 

This year, Kristen Schepel from NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory is participating in an employee exchange (known as a detail) with the U.S Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) in Washington, D.C. Her assignment: Help patent examiners and others at the USPTO understand climate change and the need for innovations that can help predict and measure its impacts.

Kristen Schepel: Changing the climate for innovation  Read More >

Wildfire blazing behind powerlines

5 unexpected consequences of extreme heat

The climate crisis has been projected to bring changes to our world of unprecedented and unpredictable depth and range. From rising seas and stronger storms, to extreme heat and disease, we are experiencing changes that scientists have predicted for decades. But what about the unexpected consequences of extreme heat due to climate change? This summer was the hottest on record and the coolest it may ever be again. As the U.S. summer heat season finally wanes, we’ve compiled a short list of five consequences of living with extreme heat for everyone to think about as we look ahead to the 2024 heat season.

5 unexpected consequences of extreme heat Read More >

Sunset view from underneath an airplane's wing

NOAA researchers fly out over the Pacific to investigate cloud-forming marine sulfur

While the shade offered by clouds on a hot sunny day can be obvious, quantifying the actual climate impact in terms of solar energy remains a challenging task. This is because the volume, thickness, and lifetime of marine clouds can change rapidly, and the processes that govern how and where clouds  form and how gases and aerosols in the air interact with cloud droplets are highly complex. In a marine environment, many of those gases and aerosols in the air come from the ocean itself. 

NOAA researchers fly out over the Pacific to investigate cloud-forming marine sulfur Read More >

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