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Elgin, Ashley

Is too many mussels even possible?

Those not familiar with the Great Lakes freshwater coasts may wonder how a seemingly endless supply of mussels could possibly be a bad thing. After all, saltwater mussels considered a delicacy by many, is a common item found on your favorite restaurant’s menu. Unfortunately, the freshwater dreissenid mussel is not only an unwelcomed item on the menu, but also in North America’s freshwater waterways. These invasive mussels have very few natural predators to limit their numbers, so their populations continue to grow and spread, wreaking havoc on the Great Lakes food web.

Barnes, Elizabeth

Questioning rivers in the sky

Since the 1960s scientists have used the so-called "butterfly effect" to explain why we struggle to predict such extreme events with more than two weeks of advanced notice. But Elizabeth Barnes, Assistant Professor at Colorado State University, is pushing the envelope. Barnes likes making complex things simple, and with her team is turning the theory about Earth’s chaotic weather patterns on its head.

Maloney, Eric

Understanding the mysterious Madden-Julian Oscillation

From the front lawn of his childhood home in the Chicago suburbs, Eric Maloney, Professor at Colorado State University and NOAA-funded scientist, experienced extreme weather ranging from blizzards to severe thunderstorms. As a kid, he even videotaped a tornado. Maloney has been fascinated with the weather ever since.

Nielsen-Gammon, John

Informing Texas with climate data and information

Texas State Climatologist and NOAA-funded scientist, John Nielsen-Gammon, has helped the state of Texas make the best possible use of weather and climate information for 17 years. “I became a climatologist before I actually did any climatology work,” he said. Texas State Climatologist and NOAA-funded scientist, John Nielsen-Gammon, has helped the state of Texas make the best possible use of weather and climate information for 17 years. “I became a climatologist before I actually did any climatology work,” he said.

Otkin, Jason

Predicting rapidly-developing droughts based on plant stress

Growing up on a farm in Minnesota, Jason Otkin felt that the weather controlled everything in his life. In the middle of “farm country,” Otkin’s parents made a living herding cattle and growing corn, soybeans, alfalfa, and wheat. The farm was home to sandy ground that tended to dry up quickly in the summer after some hot and dry weather, causing crop conditions to rapidly deteriorate.

Alin, Simone

Understanding the ocean's changing chemistry

Ocean chemistry is changing faster right now than at any time over the past 50 million years. “We are fundamentally altering marine ecosystems,” says NOAA oceanographer Simone Alin, Ph.D. With her colleagues at NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), Alin is responsible for monitoring the rapidly changing chemistry of seawater and understanding the ramifications for the world’s oceans, particularly the highly productive, fisheries-rich coastal waters off the west coast of North America. 

Dumas, Ed

Flying research drones and aircraft to collect data on climate change and extreme weather

Ed Dumas flies research drones and aircraft to collect data on climate change and extreme weather. He designs data sensors and data acquisition software for these manned and unmanned aircraft for NOAA’s Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 

De Boer, Gijs

NOAA scientist wins Presidential award for using science drones to understand climate change in the Arctic

NOAA/CIRES scientist Gijs de Boer wins Presidential award for using science drones to understand climate change in the Arctic. “I love being part of the UAV revolution,” says de Boer.

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Recent Profiles

Manzello, Derek

Manzello, Derek Read more
As the lead principal investigator of the Coral Reef Monitoring Program and Ocean Acidification Program, Derek Manzello, PhD, studies the impacts of ocean acidification on reefs from a variety of ocean sites over time.

Sutton, Adrienne

Sutton, Adrienne Read more

The ocean plays a huge role in the carbon cycle, absorbing 25 percent of yearly carbon emissions into the atmosphere.  Adrienne Sutton's research focuses on characterizing the extent of ocean acidification in the open ocean and coral reef environments, and how processes like the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) affect variations in ocean carbon chemistry over time and space.

Anderson, Eric

Anderson, Eric Read more

A physical scientist at the NOAA-funded Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystem Research, Eric Anderson studies the movement of water in the Great Lakes using high-powered computers.

Clark, Adam

Clark, Adam Read more
Meteorologist, research scientist, amateur storm chaser, award winner, journal editor, mentor, and advisor—Adam Clark from NOAA’s National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) never misses an opportunity to help advance the science behind severe weather prediction and forecasting.
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The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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