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Q&A: What do Arctic ice and Atlantic hurricanes have in common?

New research examines the North Atlantic Oscillation and its influence on global weather

The journal Nature Geoscience published a paper by Tom Delworth and his colleagues examining how a natural atmospheric force--the North Atlantic Oscillation--may be changing ocean currents in the North Atlantic. Among other impacts, the stronger ocean currents increase the amount of heat flowing toward polar areas, which could speed up Arctic ice melt and affect how hurricanes form. We asked Delworth a few questions about his study:

Scientists deploy autonomous sailing vessels to study whales, fish and seals

Unmanned technologies open new frontier in ocean science

NOAA Research and NOAA Fisheries have teamed up with academic and private sector partners to test innovative technologies that, if successful, will enable researchers to gather information on ocean conditions and marine species in remote areas of the ocean that are costly to reach and difficult to study.  

NOAA's Science On a Sphere® animations coming to your desktop

NOAA releases free downloadable flat screen program, great for students, teachers and science lovers

(September 1) Today NOAA released a free, downloadable flat screen version of its popular Science On a Sphere® (SOS), SOS ExplorerTM. This new way to display the dynamics of Earth’s weather and climate, plate tectonics and more will help teachers bring these stunning science visualizations, usually found at museums and science centers, into the classroom, where students can learn by exploring.


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Popular Research News

Atmospheric carbon dioxide rebounds as global pollution rates approach pre-Covid levels

Craig N. McLean, director of NOAA Research, to retire

Craig N. McLean, director of NOAA Research, to retire Read more

Craig N. McLean, assistant administrator of NOAA Research, who began his NOAA career as a uniformed officer in the NOAA Corps four decades ago and rose to lead the agency’s research division and become a champion of ocean exploration, scientific integrity and science diplomacy, has announced his plan to retire from public service on April 1, 2022.

2020’s Economic Slowdown Provides Opportunity to Investigate Ozone Pollution in the U.S.

2020’s Economic Slowdown Provides Opportunity to Investigate Ozone Pollution in the U.S. Read more

When COVID-19 pandemic began in the US, counties and cities across the nation imposed stay at home orders, closed schools or imposed travel restrictions. From March 2020 onward, many Americans hung up car keys and settled into their homes for work and school. Traffic patterns dramatically changed, and previously smog filled vistas became clearer.

Meet Ko Barrett: NOAA's senior advisor for climate and IPCC vice-chair

Meet Ko Barrett: NOAA's senior advisor for climate and IPCC vice-chair Read more

At the end of October, a small team of NOAA experts traveled to Glasgow, Scotland to attend the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26), an international summit aimed at accelerating climate action across the globe. 

NOAA’s new uncrewed glider poised to help vastly increase high-altitude research

NOAA’s new uncrewed glider poised to help vastly increase high-altitude research Read more

NOAA scientists are testing a reliable, low-tech, uncrewed glider that can return a small payload of scientific instruments from the stratosperhere to a pre-determined landing spot, potentially opening up vast new reaches of the atmosphere to scientific investigation. 

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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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