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Warming ocean may bring major changes for U.S. northeast fish species

Warming ocean may bring major changes for U.S. northeast fish species

NOAA scientists have released the first multispecies assessment of just how vulnerable U.S. marine fish and invertebrate species are to the effects of climate change. The study examined 82 species that occur off the Northeastern U.S., where ocean warming is occurring rapidly.  Researchers found that most species evaluated will be affected, and that some are likely to be more resilient to changing ocean conditions than others. The study appears in PLOS ONE, an online scholarly science journal. 
February 3, 2016 0 Comments
Warming waters a major factor in Gulf of Maine cod collapse

Warming waters a major factor in Gulf of Maine cod collapse

For centuries, cod was the backbone of New England’s fisheries and a key species in the Gulf of Maine ecosystem. Today, cod stocks in the gulf are on the verge of collapse, hovering at 3-4 percent of sustainable levels. Even setting tighter limits on fishing has failed to slow this rapid decline. Now a new

 report in Science concludes that rapid warming of Gulf of Maine waters— warming in the last decade faster than in 99 percent of the global ocean —has reduced the capacity of cod to rebound from overfishing, leading to collapse.
October 29, 2015 0 Comments
Sea Grant agent works with Arctic communities to study bowhead whales

Sea Grant agent works with Arctic communities to study bowhead whales

In Alaska’s Bering Strait and Arctic regions, there are dozens of Alaskan Native tribes, many of whom depend on the marine environment for food, as they have in some cases for thousands of years.  In this world more foreign to most Americans than many other countries (and bigger than many too) works exactly one NOAA Oceanic & Atmospheric Research Sea Grant extension agent: Gay Sheffield.

March 9, 2015 0 Comments
Research identifies hot spots for addressing ocean acidification risks to US shellfisheries

Research identifies hot spots for addressing ocean acidification risks to US shellfisheries

We caught up with Dwight Gledhill, deputy director of NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program, and one of the 17 authors of a perspective published today in Nature Climate Change on vulnerability of U.S. shellfisheries to ocean acidification.
February 23, 2015 0 Comments
New study finds Alaskans familiar with ocean acidification, not aware of risks to fisheries

New study finds Alaskans familiar with ocean acidification, not aware of risks to fisheries

New research published in Marine Policy from the first Alaska-focused study on public understanding and awareness of ocean acidification risk shows that Alaskans are three times more aware of ocean acidification than Americans in general.  However, Alaskans have difficulty seeing ocean acidification as an immediate risk, and the direct risks to Alaska’s fisheries are still not well understood. The research, “Gauging perceptions of ocean acidification in Alaska,” can be read online.


December 22, 2014 0 Comments
NOAA Sea Grant awards $2.6 million for new aquaculture projects

NOAA Sea Grant awards $2.6 million for new aquaculture projects

Today NOAA Sea Grant is announcing new grants totaling $2.6 million for 15 projects to support the development of environmentally and economically sustainable ocean, coastal, or Great Lakes aquaculture. Through university, state and other partnerships, Sea Grant Programs will supplement the federal funding with an additional $1.4 million in non-federal matching funds, bringing the total investment to about $4 million for new national projects in 2014. These new research projects are in addition to multi-year extension and technology transfer projects selected in FY13.

November 25, 2014 0 Comments
NOAA-led study shows Alaska fisheries and communities at risk from ocean acidification

NOAA-led study shows Alaska fisheries and communities at risk from ocean acidification

Ocean acidification is driving changes in waters vital to Alaska’s valuable commercial fisheries and subsistence way of life, according to new NOAA-led research that will be published online in Progress in Oceanography.

July 29, 2014 0 Comments
Carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean is increasing faster than expected

Carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean is increasing faster than expected

New NOAA research has revealed unprecedented changes in ocean carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean over the last 14 years, influencing the role the oceans play in current and projected global warming and ocean acidification. Natural variability has dominated patterns in ocean CO2 in this region, but observations now show human activity contributes to increasing CO2 levels.

March 26, 2014 0 Comments
Mapping climate change in the oceans

Mapping climate change in the oceans

An interview with Mike Alexander, research meteorologist at NOAA’s Earth System Research Lab in Boulder, Colorado, about a new web portal that maps climate change effects in oceans. The new web portal is helping NOAA Fisheries Service with its new process to assess how vulnerable fish stocks are to climate change.

March 4, 2014 0 Comments
Invasive Fish Becomes Nutritious Dish for Haitians in Need

Invasive Fish Becomes Nutritious Dish for Haitians in Need

Some innovative thinking by Louisiana Sea Grant is turning invasive Asian Carp into a high-quality protein source for the children living in a Haitian orphanage.

May 2, 2012 0 Comments
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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of theĀ NOAA, a bureau of theĀ Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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