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Searching for the seeds of Arctic clouds

Searching for the seeds of Arctic clouds

 

Editor's note: This is the sixth in a series Dispatches from the Arctic on the August science cruise by NOAA and partner scientists aboard the Coast Guard icebreaker Healy. Today's post is from Dr. Jessie Cremean of NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory.

August 23, 2018 0 Comments
Rivers in the sky

Rivers in the sky

Yes, there are rivers in the sky!  Atmospheric rivers, to be exact, are narrow bands of moisture that regularly form above the Pacific Ocean and flow towards North America’s west coast, drenching it in rain and packing it with snow.   These rivers, which transport more water than the Amazon or the Mississippi, have a far-reaching impact - even on the food you may be eating today.

With this week’s  January 14 sailing of NOAA’s largest ship, the Ronald H. Brown, a major investigation of atmospheric rivers named CalWater 2015 is now underway.

January 16, 2015 0 Comments
NOAA research shows limits to detecting geo-engineered increases to sunlight reflection

NOAA research shows limits to detecting geo-engineered increases to sunlight reflection

A perspective from NOAA and NASA scientists published online on January 29, 2014 in Nature Climate Change addresses a key question surrounding proposals to engineer the Earth’s climate to increase the planet’s reflection of sunlight to counteract climate warming: Could we measure manmade increases in reflectivity?

January 29, 2014 0 Comments
The origins of cirrus: Earth’s highest clouds have dusty core

The origins of cirrus: Earth’s highest clouds have dusty core

Scientists have found that wispy cirrus clouds have cores of dust and metallic particles, answering questions about how these clouds form and giving insight into their climatic implications in the future.

May 9, 2013 0 Comments
Thin, low Arctic clouds played an important role in the massive 2012 Greenland ice melt

Thin, low Arctic clouds played an important role in the massive 2012 Greenland ice melt

Clouds over the central Greenland Ice Sheet last July were “just right” for driving surface temperatures there above the melting point.

April 3, 2013 0 Comments
NOAA, partners kick off multi-state study of how thunderstorms affect upper atmosphere

NOAA, partners kick off multi-state study of how thunderstorms affect upper atmosphere

Today marks the beginning of a large-scale, comprehensive field project to measure how thunderstorms transport, produce and process chemicals that form ozone, a greenhouse gas that affects Earth's climate, air quality and weather patterns.

May 15, 2012 0 Comments
NOAA Researchers Honored for Outstanding Scientific Publications

NOAA Researchers Honored for Outstanding Scientific Publications

Twenty-one researchers have received 2010 Outstanding Scientific Paper Awards from NOAA’s Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research for discoveries that are expected to help improve weather forecasting and further understanding of climate change and ozone depletion. 
February 1, 2012 0 Comments
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The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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