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Robots probe ocean depths in mission to fine-tune hurricane forecasts

Robots probe ocean depths in mission to fine-tune hurricane forecasts

Four ocean gliders are setting off to sea to bring back data that scientists hope will improve the accuracy of hurricane forecast models. 

July 15, 2019 0 Comments
Are tropical cyclones moving at a more leisurely pace?

Are tropical cyclones moving at a more leisurely pace?

A recent NOAA-led study found the speed of movement of tropical cyclones, including hurricanes, has been slowing in recent decades, with more storms lumbering slowly over land and potentially causing more flooding. However, new research published in Nature by another NOAA scientist casts some doubt that tropical cyclones are slowing and that there’s a link to climate change.

June 6, 2019 0 Comments
Catherine Martin

Catherine Martin

The former Chief of Operations at the NOAA Aircraft Operations Center in Lakeland, Florida, pilot and NOAA Corps CAPT Catherine A. Martin is now the Executive Director of NOAA Boulder Laboratories.

October 17, 2018 0 Comments
Drifting buoys track Hurricane Michael in the Gulf of Mexico

Drifting buoys track Hurricane Michael in the Gulf of Mexico

On Monday night, October 8, 2018, 10 drifting buoys were thrown from the hatch of a U.S. Air Force Hurricane Hunter into the Gulf of Mexico so they could be in front of Hurricane Michael to help with hurricane forecasting.

October 12, 2018 0 Comments
NOAA Science Report highlights 2017 research accomplishments

NOAA Science Report highlights 2017 research accomplishments

The NOAA Annual Science Report provides an overview of the agency’s research portfolio, and highlights a selection of NOAA’s Research and Development accomplishments. NOAA research aided emergency response efforts across the country in 2017, from wildfires in the western United States to hurricanes in east, advanced weather forecasting, improved fisheries management, and helped improve aquaculture production.

March 9, 2018 0 Comments
NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown sets sail to boost ocean data for weather prediction

NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown sets sail to boost ocean data for weather prediction

NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown steamed out of Charleston, South Carolina, on February 15, 2018, for a multi-stage trip around the world to improve ocean data that informs US and global weather prediction.

February 10, 2018 0 Comments
Research plays vital role during relentless hurricane season

Research plays vital role during relentless hurricane season

In one of our nation’s most relentless hurricane seasons, NOAA research scientists were on the front lines of gathering key data used to help produce forecasts that saved lives and protected property. They also worked behind the scenes pushing the frontiers of weather forecasting skill in storm track, wind speeds and rainfall amounts by running and refining experimental forecast models for the future. And they tested new drones in air and water to assess their ability to gather data that can improve hurricane prediction. 

November 30, 2017 0 Comments
NOAA begins transition of powerful new tool to improve hurricane forecasts

NOAA begins transition of powerful new tool to improve hurricane forecasts

NOAA will begin using its newest weather prediction tool -- the dynamic core, Finite-Volume on a Cubed-Sphere (FV3), to provide high quality guidance to NOAA’s National Hurricane Center through the 2017 hurricane season.

May 25, 2017 0 Comments
Unmanned aircraft readies to sample Atlantic hurricanes

Unmanned aircraft readies to sample Atlantic hurricanes

The NASA Global Hawk unmanned aircraft touched down Friday morning at NASA Wallops Flight Facility on the Virginia coast where NOAA and NASA scientists are preparing it for flights over Atlantic hurricanes.

 
August 19, 2016 0 Comments
Q&A: What do Arctic ice and Atlantic hurricanes have in common?

Q&A: What do Arctic ice and Atlantic hurricanes have in common?

The journal Nature Geoscience published a paper by Tom Delworth and his colleagues examining how a natural atmospheric force--the North Atlantic Oscillation--may be changing ocean currents in the North Atlantic. Among other impacts, the stronger ocean currents increase the amount of heat flowing toward polar areas, which could speed up Arctic ice melt and affect how hurricanes form. We asked Delworth a few questions about his study:

June 20, 2016 0 Comments
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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of theĀ NOAA, a bureau of theĀ Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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