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NOAA teams up with India to strengthen ocean observations

NOAA teams up with India to strengthen ocean observations

A team of 20 NOAA scientists are in Goa, India, to meet with 200 of India’s leading ocean, atmosphere and fisheries scientists to mark a decade of productive collaboration on ocean and atmospheric observations, with life-saving economic benefits for both nations. The NOAA and Indian scientists will also board NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown to launch new observational buoys in the Indian Ocean to improve the vitally important Indian Ocean observing system of buoys, a key tool for India and the United States to forecast everything from monsoons to severe weather in the United States.

June 12, 2018 0 Comments
NOAA and international partners plan upgrade of global weather and ocean observing system

NOAA and international partners plan upgrade of global weather and ocean observing system

NOAA met with ocean observations experts from six nations and 13 global organizations in May 2017 in Honolulu, Hawaii, to plan for the redesign of the Tropical Pacific Observing System by the year 2020 (TPOS 2020). 

June 26, 2017 0 Comments
NOAA invests $4.5 million to improve ocean observations for weather and climate prediction

NOAA invests $4.5 million to improve ocean observations for weather and climate prediction

NOAA’s Climate Program Office announced today that it is investing $4.5 million in four projects to test technology designed to improve the Tropical Pacific Observing System, an array of buoys in the tropical Pacific used to better understand El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), how it develops, and how it affects Earth’s weather.

June 8, 2016 0 Comments
Ocean temperatures may hold key to predicting tornado outbreaks

Ocean temperatures may hold key to predicting tornado outbreaks

Tornados are one of nature’s most destructive forces. Currently, our capacity to predict tornados and other severe weather risks does not extend beyond seven days. In a recent paper published in Environmental Research Letters, scientists with NOAA and the University of Miami identified how patterns in the spring phases of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), coupled with variability in North Atlantic sea surface temperatures, could help predict U.S. regional tornado outbreaks. 

April 11, 2016 0 Comments
NOAA launches unprecedented effort to discover how El Niño affects weather

NOAA launches unprecedented effort to discover how El Niño affects weather

NOAA scientists and partners have embarked on a land, sea, and air campaign in the tropical Pacific to study the current El Niño and gather data in an effort to improve weather forecasts thousands of miles away.
February 5, 2016 0 Comments
Great Lakes water levels at or above average for next 6 months

Great Lakes water levels at or above average for next 6 months

Scientists from NOAA, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Environment Canada have issued a six-month forecast for water levels to be at or above average on Lake Superior, Michigan, Huron, and Erie into spring of 2016. Lake Ontario water levels are expected to remain close to monthly averages. However, the impacts of the anticipated strong El Niño and other atmospheric anomalies on the forecast are difficult to predict.
November 19, 2015 0 Comments
What does “normal” mean anyway?

What does “normal” mean anyway?

In the Great Lakes region, memories of the brutal winter of 2013-2014 are still fresh in residents’ minds. That winter brought very cold surface water temperatures and high ice cover well into the 2014 spring. Coupled with a record-setting water level surge of nearly three feet between January 2013 and December 2014, people who live along the shore of Lake Michigan have been wondering whether this is the “new normal” for the lake.
May 4, 2015 0 Comments
NOAA Seeks Answers to Great Lakes Water Level Changes

NOAA Seeks Answers to Great Lakes Water Level Changes

While people along our nation’s coast experience rising sea levels, residents along the Great Lakes – the Earth’s largest lake system – are adapting to the opposite problem: chronic low water levels and a receding shoreline.

In a perspective now running in Science magazine, Drew Gronewold, a hydrologist at NOAA’s Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, says “the record low water levels in Lake Michigan-Huron in the winter of 2012 to 2013 raise important questions about the driving forces behind water level fluctuations and how water resource management planning decisions can be improved.” 

March 6, 2014 0 Comments
NOAA research finds new way to identify which El Niño events will have biggest impact on U.S. winter weather

NOAA research finds new way to identify which El Niño events will have biggest impact on U.S. winter weather

New research from NOAA and the University of Washington suggests that using satellites to detect heat from deep convective cloud tops may be a way to detect El Niño and could help forecasters predict the unusual weather it causes.
February 7, 2013 0 Comments
Scientists show climate patterns may influence extreme U.S. tornado seasons

Scientists show climate patterns may influence extreme U.S. tornado seasons

NOAA and university researchers believe they have found a climate signal related to a specific phase of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation that could be linked to, and possibly serve as a predictor of, massive tornado outbreaks.

October 15, 2012 0 Comments
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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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