Search

Stay Connected

NOAA Research News

NOAA scientists use drones to see tornado damage in remote areas

NOAA scientists use drones to see tornado damage in remote areas

Scientists hope images from the research drones will improve our understanding of tornadoes and lead to better forecasts. 

April 20, 2021 0 Comments
5 ways NOAA scientists are answering big questions about climate change

5 ways NOAA scientists are answering big questions about climate change

From warmer ocean temperatures to longer and more intense droughts and heat waves, climate change is affecting our entire planet. Scientists at NOAA have long worked to track, understand and predict how climate change is progressing and impacting ecosystems, communities and economies.

April 20, 2021 0 Comments
Commerce building now part of NOAA, NIST weather and greenhouse gas tracking network

Commerce building now part of NOAA, NIST weather and greenhouse gas tracking network

NOAA and NIST have installed a Doppler lidar instrument to an existing weather station on top of the Department of Commerce’s Herbert Clark Hoover Building in Washington, D.C. to measure wind flow and turbulence in the lowest part of the atmosphere for a research project studying greenhouse gas emissions in the Capitol area. 

April 19, 2021 0 Comments
Giant Australian bushfire injected 1 million tons of smoke in the atmosphere

Giant Australian bushfire injected 1 million tons of smoke in the atmosphere

Massive high-altitude clouds of smoke warmed the Southern Hemisphere's stratospshere by about 1 degree Celsius for six months, and likely contributed to the large and persistent ozone hole that formed over Antarctica during the austral spring.

April 15, 2021 0 Comments
NOAA report highlights 2020 climate, weather, ocean research

NOAA report highlights 2020 climate, weather, ocean research

Launching uncrewed systems to monitor climate and ecosystem changes in the U.S. Arctic, sequencing the genome for endangered marine species, and improving weather forecasts with advances in regional models — these are just a few of NOAA’s scientific achievements in 2020. The newly released 2020 NOAA Science Report highlights the ways these accomplishments — and many more — provide the foundation for vital services that Americans use every day. 

April 14, 2021 0 Comments
Despite pandemic shutdowns, carbon dioxide and methane surged in 2020

Despite pandemic shutdowns, carbon dioxide and methane surged in 2020

The global average carbon dioxide level in the atmosphere surged at the fifth-highest rate in NOAA's 63-year record during 2020. Preliminary estimates of the increase in methane levels indicate it may have been the largest annual jump on record.  

April 7, 2021 0 Comments
New study shows promise of forecasting meteotsunamis

New study shows promise of forecasting meteotsunamis

On the afternoon of April 13, 2018, a large wave of water surged across Lake Michigan and flooded the shores of the picturesque beach town of Ludington, Michigan, damaging homes and boat docks, and flooding intake pipes. Thanks to a local citizen’s photos and other data, NOAA scientists reconstructed the event in models and determined this was the first ever documented meteotsunami in the Great Lakes caused by an atmospheric inertia-gravity wave.

March 31, 2021 0 Comments
NOAA Sea Grant facilitates external research to determine abundance of red snapper

NOAA Sea Grant facilitates external research to determine abundance of red snapper

Sea Grant and its research partners has announced two updates on efforts to better understand red snapper populations in U.S. coastal waters.

March 25, 2021 0 Comments
Government interventions rather than climate conditions primarily curb COVID-19’s spread

Government interventions rather than climate conditions primarily curb COVID-19’s spread

Government interventions, such as mask mandates and school closures, rather than meteorological factors appear to have primarily influenced COVID-19’s spread in 2020 and early 2021, according to a new report.

March 18, 2021 0 Comments
Climate-driven shifts in deep Lake Michigan water temperatures signal the loss of winter

Climate-driven shifts in deep Lake Michigan water temperatures signal the loss of winter

Climate change is causing significant impacts on the Great Lakes and the surrounding region. As the largest surface freshwater system in the world, the Great Lakes have an enormous impact, seen and unseen, on the more than 34 million people who live within their collective basin. Because of their unique response to environmental conditions, Earth’s large lakes are considered by scientists as key sentinels of climate change. A long-term study published in Nature Communications today from NOAA reveals a warming trend in deepwater temperatures that foreshadows profound ecological change on the horizon. While less visible than the loss in ice cover and increasing lake surface temperatures, this latest index of climate change adds to the growing evidence of climate change impacts in the region. 

March 16, 2021 0 Comments
RSS
12345678Last

OAR HEADQUARTERS

Phone: 301-713-2458
Address: 1315 East-West Highway Silver Spring, MD 20910

Stay Connected

ABOUT US

Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

CONTACT US

Can't Find What You Need?
Send Feedback
Copyright 2018 by NOAA Terms Of Use Privacy Statement
Back To Top