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NOAA Research News

Keeping invasive fish species out of the Great Lakes

Keeping invasive fish species out of the Great Lakes

NOAA scientist Carol Stepien will present research results at a public forum this week in Toledo, Ohio, on how local bait shops, anglers and the public can prevent invasive fish from accidentally being released into the Great Lakes.

April 24, 2018
NOAA and partners launch buoy to track changing coastal chemistry in Chesapeake Bay

NOAA and partners launch buoy to track changing coastal chemistry in Chesapeake Bay

A new buoy, launched by NOAA and partners at the mouth of Chesapeake Bay, will measure changes in ocean acidification that could impact the bay and its valuable shellfish.

April 6, 2018
Snapping shrimp may ring 'dinner bell' for gray whales off the Oregon coast

Snapping shrimp may ring 'dinner bell' for gray whales off the Oregon coast

Editor's note: The following story is adapted from a news article released by the American Geophysical Union on February 13, 2018. PORTLAND — Scientists have for the first time captured the sounds of snapping shrimp off the Oregon coast and...
February 12, 2018
Scientific team selected to conduct independent abundance estimate of red snapper in Gulf of Mexico

Scientific team selected to conduct independent abundance estimate of red snapper in Gulf of Mexico

A team of university and government scientists, selected by an expert review panel convened by the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium, will conduct an independent study to estimate the number of red snapper in the U.S. waters of the Gulf of Mexico.
November 20, 2017
Sea Grant announces 93 million for aquaculture research and industry support

Sea Grant announces 93 million for aquaculture research and industry support

NOAA has announced 32 research grants totaling $9.3 million for projects around the country to further develop the nation’s marine and coastal aquaculture industry. 

October 31, 2017
NOAA scientists set sail on Coast Guard icebreaker to measure change in the Arctic

NOAA scientists set sail on Coast Guard icebreaker to measure change in the Arctic

On Friday, August 25, U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy will sail from Dutch Harbor, Alaska, with a team of NOAA scientists and collaborators on a 22-day cruise to study environmental change in the western Arctic Ocean.

August 22, 2017
New model reveals how ocean acidification challenges tiny sea snails off U.S. West Coast

New model reveals how ocean acidification challenges tiny sea snails off U.S. West Coast

A tiny sea snail, sometimes called a sea butterfly because of how it flutters about traveling the ocean currents, is part of the diet for such valuable fish as salmon and cod off the U.S West Coast. A new study models the journey of this delicate plankton from offshore...
July 13, 2017
Summer of sailing drones

Summer of sailing drones

Over the next four months, NOAA scientists will launch unmanned ocean vehicles, called Saildrones, from the Arctic to the tropical Pacific Ocean to help better understand how changes in the ocean are affecting weather, climate, fisheries and marine mammals. The wind and...
July 11, 2017
Cracking the code of a long-distance swimmer

Cracking the code of a long-distance swimmer

Born in the Sargasso Sea, that Atlantic Ocean gyre east of Bermuda, baby European eels will travel 4,000 miles to the freshwater rivers of Europe. Now scientists might have answered a century-old question of how these young eels accomplish such vast oceanic migrations.
April 13, 2017
Research shows ocean acidification is spreading rapidly in the Arctic

Research shows ocean acidification is spreading rapidly in the Arctic

Ocean acidification is spreading rapidly in the western Arctic Ocean in both area and depth, potentially affecting shellfish, other marine species in the food web, and communities that depend on these resources, according to new research published in Nature Climate Change...
March 9, 2017
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The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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