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Healing ozone layer stopped migration of Southern Hemisphere winds

Healing ozone layer stopped migration of Southern Hemisphere winds

A NOAA study published in the journal Nature demonstrates a profound effect of the Montreal Protocol: as levels of ozone-depleting chemicals controlled by the intenational treaty declined, a poleward shift of summertime circulation patterns in the Southern Hemisphere halted. 

March 27, 2020 0 Comments
NOAA Science Report highlights 2019 research accomplishments

NOAA Science Report highlights 2019 research accomplishments

March 3, 2020 0 Comments
NOAA scientist to serve as expert in Wikipedia edit-a-thon

NOAA scientist to serve as expert in Wikipedia edit-a-thon

February 18, 2020 0 Comments
New chemical discovered during historic airborne research mission to spur reexamination of marine sulfur cycle and climate models

New chemical discovered during historic airborne research mission to spur reexamination of marine sulfur cycle and climate models

The discovery of a novel sulfur compound during a 2017 NASA airborne research campaign will likely spur a scientific reassessment of a fundamental marine chemical cycle which drives the formation of oceanic clouds that play a key role in moderating climate.  “People thought the sulfur budget was well understood,” said NOAA scientist Patricia Quinn, who was not involved in the study. “This throws a kink in the whole works.”

February 18, 2020 0 Comments
Storm-induced sea level spikes expected to increase on the Gulf and Atlantic coasts

Storm-induced sea level spikes expected to increase on the Gulf and Atlantic coasts

Using a new powerful NOAA global climate model, NOAA and partner researchers show that big storm-induced spikes in sea levels will increase in the future from the Gulf Coast to the Atlantic coast as warming progresses, but will be driven by differing forces.

February 13, 2020 0 Comments
Barbadian students tour NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown

Barbadian students tour NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown

Air & Sea Chronicles

Editor's note: Air & Sea Chronicles is NOAA's blog series documenting the ATOMIC mission in Barbados. This post is by Cindy Sandoval, a communications specialist from NOAA Fisheries who was on detial assisting NOAA Communications with ATOMIC outreach. 

Over 50 Barbadian or Bajan students toured NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown during the vessel’s short port call in Bridgetown, Barbados. While aboard, students learned about NOAA’s mission, the role the vessel plays in cutting-edge research, and why their island nation is at the center of an unprecedented effort to better understand the interactions of atmosphere and ocean. 

February 12, 2020 0 Comments
Climate change could trigger more landslides in High Mountain Asia

Climate change could trigger more landslides in High Mountain Asia

More frequent and intense rainfall events due to climate change could cause more landslides in the High Mountain Asia region of China, Tibet and Nepal, according to the first quantitative study of the link between precipitation and landslides in the region.

 

February 11, 2020 0 Comments
NOAA unveils expanded and enhanced Climate Explorer

NOAA unveils expanded and enhanced Climate Explorer

An expanded and redesigned version of NOAA’s online, open-source Climate Explorer tool was released today to improve support for local planners, policy leaders, and facility and resource managers. The tool gives people a way to explore conditions projected for their locations in the coming decades. 

January 30, 2020 0 Comments
A Sea of Sondes

A Sea of Sondes

Air & Sea Chronicles is NOAA's blog series documenting the ATOMIC mission in Barbados. This is the third post from Janet Intrieri, a research scientist from NOAA's Earth System Research Lab Physical Sciences Division, who gives us a recap of a week releasing weather balloons on the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown.

January 24, 2020 0 Comments
NOAA teams up with Viking to conduct and share science aboard new Great Lakes expedition voyages

NOAA teams up with Viking to conduct and share science aboard new Great Lakes expedition voyages

NOAA plans to expand its research in the Great Lakes region as the agency teams up with the travel company Viking to carry scientists aboard new expedition voyages planned to begin in 2022.

January 16, 2020 0 Comments
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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of theĀ NOAA, a bureau of theĀ Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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