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Five NOAA Research scientists to receive Presidential awards for early career achievement

Five NOAA Research scientists to receive Presidential awards for early career achievement

President Trump has named five NOAA Research scientists among 314 federally-supported scientists as recipients of the prestigious Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). They join three other NOAA scientists who will receive the highest honor bestowed by the United States Government to outstanding scientists and engineers who are beginning their research careers and show exceptional promise for leadership in science and technology. 

“We are remarkably proud of the innovative research being conducted by these early career scientists at NOAA Research labs and cooperative institutes,” said Craig McLean, NOAA assistant administrator for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research. “Their research and public communication about their science is helping address some of the most pressing weather, climate, and ocean challenges or our time.”

Andrew Hoell

Andrew Hoell

Established in 1996, the PECASE awards honor the contributions that scientists and engineers have made to the advancement of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), and to community service as demonstrated by their scientific leadership, public education, and community outreach. Award recipients will be honored on Thursday, July 25, 2019 at the Daughters of the American Revolution, Constitution Hall, in Washington, D.C.

Meet the five NOAA Research awardees:

From NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado

Andrew Hoell, a NOAA research scientist in the Physical Sciences Division, has become a leading international researcher exploring the physical processes in the climate system leading to the onset, persistence and recovery from of regional drought, and the need to better represent these processes in forecast systems to improve regional predictions of drought. Hoell has applied his research to support the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET), a project of USAID that coordinates with government agencies, national government ministries and international partners to collect data and produce objective, forward-looking analysis on the world’s most food-insecure countries.

Andrew Rollins

Andrew Rollins

Andrew Rollins is a NOAA scientist in the Chemical Sciences Division who studies the role of water vapor in the lower stratosphere. Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas (carbon dioxide is the most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas) and has a disproportionately large role in this region. Rollins has expanded his research to developing a new class of instrument for the detection of low values of sulfur in the lower stratosphere. Sulfur from natural and anthropogenic sources at the surface makes its way to the stratosphere and ultimately forms aerosol that influences Earth’s radiative balance and hence climate. Much of the work for which Rollins was honored occurred while he was a Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) scientist working at ESRL.

Brian McDonald

Brian McDonald

Brian C. McDonald is a CIRES scientist who also works in Chemical Sciences Division. McDonald has developed innovative approaches that improve the scientific understanding of the sources of atmospheric pollutants and link human activity to environmental change. He was lead author on a 2017 paper that found that emissions from a broad class of consumer products are now a significant source of ozone and particulate pollution.

From NOAA’s Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab in Ann Arbor, Michigan 

Eric Anderson, a physical scientist at NOAA’s Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, is a leader in developing innovative tools to predict the physical nature of Great Lakes waters. By engaging with decision-makers and academic and commercial partners, Anderson works to support NOAA’s mission to build coastal resilience to extreme storms, help stakeholders prepare and respond to oil spills, and predict the intensity and location of harmful algal blooms.

Eric Anderson

Eric Anderson

The models he has developed have assisted the U.S. Coast Guard for search and rescue operations; helped track contaminants in the lakes; and helped identify the dangerous nearshore conditions caused by meteotsunamis. Anderson is actively engaged in developing and transitioning systems to operations that will help predict ice extent, wave height, and surface runoff, as well as inform NOAA’s ecological forecasting.

From NOAA’s National Severe Storms Lab in Norman, Oklahoma

Jeffrey Snyder, a meteorologist at NOAA’s National Severe Storms Laboratory, leads cutting-edge research using weather radar to improve the detection and short-term forecasts of severe thunderstorms. His research-to-operations initiatives include a focus on improving the detection of large hail and tornadoes. He is working to identify when and where hail is growing far above the ground within thunderstorms to increase warning lead time. He has developed an automated system to detect debris-producing tornadoes that may prove valuable for identifying tornadoes that would otherwise go unreported.

Jeffrey Snyder

Jeffrey Snyder

Snyder is also examining how radar data can best be used by weather models to improve forecasts and warnings for the public, and he continues to study the structure of tornadoes and supercell thunderstorms observed by mobile radars. He was a research scientist with the University of Oklahoma Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies at the time of his nomination. 

In addition, NOAA Fisheries is proud to announce their three award recipients: Elizabeth Siddon of the Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Michelle Barbieri of the Pacific Islands Science Center, and Melissa Soldevilla of the Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Read more about their individual accomplishments in a story by NOAA Fisheries.

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