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Rural West sees more smog; now scientists may know why
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Rural West sees more smog; now scientists may know why

Ground-level ozone, also known as smog, has climbed in the rural West over the past 25 years, even in such seemingly pristine places as Yellowstone National Park. Now, scientists may have found out why – and why cutting our own output of smog-forming chemicals such as nitrogen oxide hasn’t helped.

Researchers from NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory and Princeton University found that increased pollution from Asia, which has tripled its nitrogen oxide emissions since 1990, is to blame for the persistence of smog in the West, despite American laws reducing the smog-forming chemicals coming from automobile tailpipes and factories.

Smog has decreased overall in the eastern United States, even though levels can spike during heat waves.

Ozone can be harmful to human health, causing asthma attacks and difficulty breathing. It can also harm sensitive trees and crops.

More information:

Princeton University press release

NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics research highlight

Paper in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

For more information, please contact Monica Allen, director of public affairs at NOAA Research, at 301-734-1123 or by email at monica.allen@noaa.gov


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