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NOAA Research News

Mining weather data from Civil War-era Navy logbooks

Old weather data helps scientists understand our changing climate

A new grant will let a University of Washington-based project add a new fleet to its quest to learn more about past climate from the records of long-gone mariners. The UW is among the winners of the 2017 “Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives” awards, announced earlier this month by the Washington, D.C.-based Council on Library and Information Resources. Kevin Wood, a research scientist with the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, a research center operated by NOAA and UW, will lead the project.

Research plays vital role during relentless hurricane season

In one of our nation’s most relentless hurricane seasons, NOAA research scientists were on the front lines of gathering key data used to help produce forecasts that saved lives and protected property. They also worked behind the scenes pushing the frontiers of weather forecasting skill in storm track, wind speeds and rainfall amounts by running and refining experimental forecast models for the future. And they tested new drones in air and water to assess their ability to gather data that can improve hurricane prediction. 

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Popular Research News

NOAA research model brings severe weather into focus

NOAA research model brings severe weather into focus Read more

NOAA’s best severe-weather model just received an upgrade developed by NOAA researchers that will help the National Weather Service provide more accurate hazardous weather and aviation forecasts.  Scientists are also using it to advance a wide array of future forecast tools. 

When noise becomes signal

When noise becomes signal Read more

Last spring, Governor Jerry Brown declared an end to California’s historic drought that caused over $5 billion in damage to agriculture as well as substantial impacts to fisheries, infrastructure, human health, and vegetation. The drought was not only severe, but it also spanned the winters of 2015-16 and 2016-17, which had unusual and unexpected precipitation that affected the drought’s evolution.

A bird’s eye view of the Arctic - and future weather research

A bird’s eye view of the Arctic - and future weather research Read more

New NOAA research demonstrates that drones and weather balloons can gather data needed to improve weather forecasts in severe working environments. 

Ready for summer heat? Study finds new primary driver of extreme Texas heat waves

Ready for summer heat? Study finds new primary driver of extreme Texas heat waves Read more

Summer is finally here, and that means families all over the country are starting to fire up the barbecue grill and open up their beach chairs. But summertime also means hot weather — sometimes dangerously hot.

NOAA Arctic explorers sail North

NOAA Arctic explorers sail North Read more

This is the first in a series Dispatches from the Arctic on the August science cruise by NOAA and partner scientists aboard the Coast Guard icebreaker Healy. Today's post is from Emily Osborne, Arctic Program Manager at NOAA Research,  Janet Hsiao, NOAA John Knauss Sea Grant fellow, and Meredith LaValley of the Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee.

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Phone: 301-713-2458
Address: 1315 East-West Highway Silver Spring, MD 20910

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The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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