Search

Stay Connected

NOAA Research News

A sea change in the Arctic atmosphere

Thinning sea ice in spring affects ozone chemistry with implications for mercury contamination

Arctic warming has thinned springtime sea ice across the Arctic Ocean. A new study shows that this alters the chemistry of the atmosphere near the Earth’s surface and may increase the amount of toxic mercury contaminating the region.

NOAA, partners kick off multi-state study of how thunderstorms affect upper atmosphere

Scientists will explore role of storms in forming ozone chemicals that affect weather, climate

Today marks the beginning of a large-scale, comprehensive field project to measure how thunderstorms transport, produce and process chemicals that form ozone, a greenhouse gas that affects Earth's climate, air quality and weather patterns.

RSS
First6869707172737475Last

Popular Research News

Indo-Pacific Ocean warming is changing global rainfall patterns

Indo-Pacific Ocean warming is changing global rainfall patterns Read more

New research by NOAA and a visiting scientist from India shows that warming of the Indo-Pacific Ocean is altering rainfall patterns from the tropics to the United States, contributing to declines in rainfall on the United States west and east coasts.

NOAA launches major field campaign to improve weather and climate prediction

NOAA launches major field campaign to improve weather and climate prediction Read more

Picture a calm, sunny day at a tropical beach. You look out at the ocean and in the distance a flotilla of small white clouds sails close to the waves. It’s ideal weather and typical of many days in the tropical Atlantic. However, scientists don’t fully understand how these ubiquitous clouds (a type of “shallow convective cloud”) form and impact the ocean, and it represents one of the largest uncertainties in predicting climate change.

From hurricanes to seal pups: 4 ways drones are helping NOAA scientists conduct research

NOAA researchers are working to make traveling in winter weather safer

Tiny shells reveal waters off California are acidifying twice as fast as the global ocean

Tiny shells reveal waters off California are acidifying twice as fast as the global ocean Read more

In first-of-its-kind research, NOAA scientists and academic partners used 100 years of microscopic shells to show that the coastal waters off California are acidifying twice as fast as the global ocean average — with the seafood supply in the crosshairs.

RSS
«January 2020»
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
2930311234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930311
2345678

OAR HEADQUARTERS

Phone: 301-713-2458
Address: 1315 East-West Highway Silver Spring, MD 20910

Stay Connected

ABOUT US

Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

CONTACT US

Can't Find What You Need?
Send Feedback
Copyright 2018 by NOAA Terms Of Use Privacy Statement
Back To Top