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Forecasters get new system to manage ‘flood’ of weather data, improve forecasts

NOAA puts into operation Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor system developed at National Severe Storms Laboratory

Weather forecasters rely on an incredibly large amount of information when they make forecasts and issue warnings. A new system, activated by NOAA’s National Weather Service last week, quickly harnesses the tremendous amount of weather data from multiple sources, intelligently integrates the information, and provides a detailed picture of the current weather.

NOAA Sea Grant Awards $15.9 million for projects to build resilient coastal communities

Federal grants leverage $7.9 million nonfederal match, for total of $23.8 million

NOAA Sea Grant announced today grants totaling $15.9 million to support over 300 projects around the nation that help build resilient coastal communities and economies. Through university, state and other partnerships, Sea Grant Programs will supplement the federal funding with an additional $7.9 million in non-federal matching funds, bringing the total investment to more than $23.8 million.

 

Deep Argo will help unlock mystery of deep ocean effects on climate

Gregory C. Johnson, a NOAA oceanographer at the Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, and John M. Lyman, an oceanographer at NOAA’s cooperative institute with the University of Hawaii, the Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, have written an essay published online in Nature Climate Change about how a new international program can help fill a major gap in information about the heat in the deep ocean. We caught up with Johnson to learn more.

NOAA flies over Arctic to measure extent of sea ice

Annual fall mission helps gauge climate change in Arctic

NOAA researchers set out this week on a two-week mission to fly over the Arctic to measure how much the ice has melted over the summer and gauge the speed of this fall’s refreezing of sea ice. This is the second year in a row scientists have flown above Arctic waters.  Data gathered from both years is testing a hypothesis that increased summer heat stored in the newly sea-ice free areas of the Arctic Ocean lead to surface heat fluxes in autumn that are large enough to have impacts on atmospheric temperature, humidity, wind and cloud distributions. 

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Popular Research News

NOAA projects 30-percent maximum Great Lakes ice cover for 2021 winter

NOAA projects 30-percent maximum Great Lakes ice cover for 2021 winter Read more

NOAA scientists project the maximum Great Lakes ice cover for 2021 will be 30 percent, higher than last year’s maximum of 19.5 percent, but part of a long-term pattern of declining ice cover likely driven by climate change. 

Emissions of a banned ozone-depleting gas are back on the decline

Emissions of a banned ozone-depleting gas are back on the decline Read more

New analyses of global air measurements show that five years after an unexpected spike in emissions of the banned ozone-depleting chemical chlorofluorocarbon CFC-11, they dropped sharply between 2018 and 2019. 

Congress reauthorizes NOAA Sea Grant through 2025

Congress reauthorizes NOAA Sea Grant through 2025 Read more

The National Sea Grant College Act was reauthorized and amended by Congress and signed by President Donald J. Trump on December 18, 2020. The reauthorization, titled the “National Sea Grant College Program Amendments Act of 2020,” includes several updates to Sea Grant’s authorizing legislation. The Act serves as a guiding framework upon which Sea Grant operates and serves America’s coastal and Great Lakes communities.

Congress reauthorizes law supporting partnerships to advance ocean science

Congress reauthorizes law supporting partnerships to advance ocean science Read more

Congress voted on January 1, 2021 to reauthorize and strengthen the National Oceanographic Partnership Program, a 23-year old program created by Congress to facilitate ocean-related partnerships between federal agencies, academia and industry to advance ocean science research and education.The reauthorization passed Congress as an amendment included in Section 1055 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021

Frigid Arctic air outbreaks may be predictable, new research suggests

Frigid Arctic air outbreaks may be predictable, new research suggests Read more

Known for precipitating outbreaks of Arctic air, stratospheric events in polar regions often cause other kinds of extreme weather. Since the stratosphere takes a long time to recover after these events, scientists may be able to improve predictability of extreme weather weeks ahead of time.

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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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