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Research to measure cost of climate change, improve prediction of severe weather

NOAA researchers team up with partners on economic and other climate research

New research appearing online today in the journal Nature Climate Change by NOAA and partners forecasts the effects of climate change on countries' economic output and suggests that rising greenhouse gases may contribute to more extreme El Niños, the climate phenomenon that can trigger severe weather. 

Public invited to join NOAA on deep sea expedition of Pacific marine protected areas

From Aug. 1 to Sept. 29, public can explore deep sea habitats and marine life with scientists and researchers

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer will begin two months of dives using unmanned remotely operated vehicles, or ROVs, to explore marine protected areas in the central Pacific Ocean. Starting on Aug. 1, anyone with an internet connection can virtually explore the deep sea with scientists and researchers from their computer or mobile device.

Stratosphere an Accomplice for Santa Ana Winds and California Wildfires

The hot and dry Santa Ana winds are associated with many of Southern California’s destructive wildfires, and even take the blame for tense, ugly moods. Now, NOAA researchers have found that on occasion the winds have an accomplice in contributing to California’s wildfires: atmospheric events known as stratospheric intrusions, which bring extremely dry air from the upper atmosphere down to the surface.

Monitoring seawater reveals ocean acidification risks to Alaskan shellfish hatchery

NOAA, University of Alaska collaborate with shellfish hatchery

New collaborative research between NOAA, University of Alaska and an Alaskan shellfish hatchery shows that ocean acidification may make it difficult for Alaskan coastal waters to support shellfish hatcheries by 2040 unless costly mitigation efforts are installed to modify seawater used in the hatcheries.

Nationwide study measures short-term spike in particulate matter due to Independence Day fireworks

Particulate matter linked to short and long-term health effects

From our nation’s founding, the Fourth of July has been synonymous with fireworks. While many grew up learning that fireworks can be dangerous to the eyes and hands if not handled properly, fireworks also produce air pollutants, including particulate matter, that are linked to short-term or long-term health effects.

NOAA has authored a new study appearing in the journal Atmospheric Environment that quantifies the surge in fine particulate matter – particles that are two and one half microns in diameter (PM2.5) – on July 4, using observations from the 315 U.S. air quality monitoring sites that operated from 1999 to 2013. The new study is the first nationwide quantitative analysis of the effects.

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Popular Research News

Carbon dioxide peaks near 420 parts per million at Mauna Loa observatory

Carbon dioxide peaks near 420 parts per million at Mauna Loa observatory Read more

In May, NOAA's measurements at the Mauna Loa observatory averaged 419.13 parts per million. Scientists at Scripps calculated a monthly average of 418.92 ppm.  It's the highest level since accurate measurements began 63 years ago.

NOAA index tracks how greenhouse gas pollution amplified global warming in 2020

NOAA index tracks how greenhouse gas pollution amplified global warming in 2020 Read more

The annual analysis of samples collected by NOAA’s Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network provides an updated measure of the excess heat trapped in the atmosphere by greenhouse gas pollution.

Meet 5 NOAA buoys that help scientists understand our weather, climate and ocean health

Meet 5 NOAA buoys that help scientists understand our weather, climate and ocean health Read more

Keeping track of ocean health is critical for understanding climate change, weather patterns, and the health of important fisheries. But how do NOAA and partner scientists gather data on such a vast environment? 

NOAA, Boeing team up to test greenhouse gas-measuring technology

NOAA, Boeing team up to test greenhouse gas-measuring technology Read more

Scientists with NOAA's Global Monitoring Laboratory will evaluate the optimal placement of greenhouse-gas sampling inlets on a Boeing 737 flying testbed owned by Alaska Air during Boeing's 2021 ecoDemonstrator technology development program. 

NOAA initiatives among the first round of Ocean Decade endorsed actions

NOAA initiatives among the first round of Ocean Decade endorsed actions Read more

NOAA scientists and priorities are well reflected in several of the first Ocean Decade actions endorsed and announced this week by the United Nations Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO (IOC).

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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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