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Flying high to measure gravity: humans optional

Unmanned plane gathers gravity information to make nation more resilient

NOAA's Unmanned Aircraft Systems Program worked through NOAA's Small Business Innovation Research Program  to test an unmanned aircraft system for gravity measurements. SBIR funds high-risk, high-reward projects that not only help NOAA to meet its mission, but open up new markets for industry. 

Measuring variations in gravity helps scientists create a height measurement system based on where water will flow. These measurements will help prepare for floods, sea level rise, and other emergencies, making our coastal communities more resilient, and aid a number of diverse industries such as agriculture, construction, transportation, and urban planning.

Extensive coral communities found in Alaska's Glacier Bay National Park

NOAA and partners explore cold water coral with remotely operated vehicle and scuba dives

On a recent research expedition in Alaska, scientists aboard the R/V Norseman IIconducted the first-ever deepwater exploration of Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. Using both surveys by scuba divers and the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Kraken2, scientists found an abundance of cold-water corals and associated organisms that use these corals as habitat, from the very bottom to the top of the submerged portion of the fjords. Prior to the expedition, little was known about ecosystems in the depths of the fjord and records of corals were sparse. 

New study released: Sea Grant Research confirms scientific consensus on climate change

Dr. Stuart Carlton is a social scientist with Texas Sea Grant. He works with Sea Grant extension agents to increase climate literacy among various stakeholder groups in Texas. “We want to help the public understand the effects of climate change, know there is a lot of good, credible science behind it, and ultimately develop real life, practical steps to adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change,” commented Carlton. 

Ocean temperatures may hold key to predicting tornado outbreaks

Research by NOAA and partners may be key to seasonal outlooks for regional tornado outbreaks

Tornados are one of nature’s most destructive forces. Currently, our capacity to predict tornados and other severe weather risks does not extend beyond seven days. In a recent paper published in Environmental Research Letters, scientists with NOAA and the University of Miami identified how patterns in the spring phases of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), coupled with variability in North Atlantic sea surface temperatures, could help predict U.S. regional tornado outbreaks. 

West Coast prepares for ‘double whammy’ threat to ocean health

New action plan will help coastal businesses boost their resilience to future changes

Rising levels of acidity in the ocean and growing areas of low-oxygen waters are a “double whammy” threat for fishing industries, ecosystems and economies along the U.S. West Coast and Canada’s British Columbia, according to new report by a panel of experts that includes NOAA scientists.

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Popular Research News

Fragrant consumer products a key source of ozone-forming pollution in New York City

Fragrant consumer products a key source of ozone-forming pollution in New York City Read more

New research from NOAA finds that fragrant personal care products - the stuff that makes you smell good - are now responsible for a significant amount of the ozone pollution known as smog that plagues major urban areas.

Low-oxygen waters off Washington, Oregon coasts risk becoming large 'dead zones'

Low-oxygen waters off Washington, Oregon coasts risk becoming large 'dead zones' Read more

A large area of poorly oxygenated water is growing off the coast of Washington and Oregon. Scientists say oxygen levels may fall low enough to create "dead zones." 

Deforestation, warming flip part of Amazon forest from carbon sink to source

Deforestation, warming flip part of Amazon forest from carbon sink to source Read more

New results from a nine-year research project in the eastern Amazon rainforest finds that significant deforestation in eastern and southeastern Brazil turned what was once a forest that absorbed carbon dioxide into a source of planet-warming carbon dioxide emissions.

Earth has two different stratospheres, and aviation may be to blame

Earth has two different stratospheres, and aviation may be to blame Read more

Findings of a new study of aerosols in the remote atmosphere finds that the northern stratosphere is significantlly more polluted than the south. Analysis of the aerosols suggests aviation is to blame. 

Human activities responsible for rapid increase in Earth's heat

Human activities responsible for rapid increase in Earth's heat Read more

A new study by Princeton University and NOAA researchers has found clear evidence of human influence on Earth’s climate in the past two decades of satellite measurements. “Human activity strongly influenced the positive trend in Earth's energy imbalance, causing a significant increase in the heat stored in the planet,” said Shiv Priyam Raghuraman, the lead researcher on the study. 

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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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