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Pacific island is natural laboratory to study ocean acidification

Ian Enochs, a scientist with NOAA’s Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies at the University of Miami, traveled in May to the Island of Maug in the Pacific Ocean as part of a NOAA expedition aboard NOAA Ship Hi’ialakai to study coral reef ecosystems. We caught up with Enochs to learn about his research on underwater vents that seep carbon dioxide into the Pacific.

Lightning experts converge on Oklahoma to discuss latest research

NOAA and University of Oklahoma host International conference June 15-20

More than 200 national and international lightning experts are gathering this week in Norman, Oklahoma, for what organizers have called “the most important international conference on atmospheric electricity in the world.”  Held every four years, the 2014 International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity is co-hosted by NOAA’s National Severe Storms Laboratory and the University of Oklahoma’s College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences, and features the latest research on lightning and other electrical phenomena in the atmosphere.

Tropical cyclone ‘maximum intensity’ is shifting toward the poles

As tropical cyclones move into higher latitudes, regions closer to the equator may experience reduced risk, while higher latitudes experience increased risk.

Over the past 30 years, the location where tropical cyclones reach maximum intensity has been shifting toward the poles in both the northern and southern hemispheres at a rate of about 35 miles, or one-half a degree of latitude, per decade according to a new study, The Poleward Migration of the Location of Tropical Cyclone Maximum Intensity, published tomorrow in Nature.

 

NOAA Researchers Contribute to The 3rd National Climate Assessment Revealing the Latest Impacts of Climate Change on the U.S.

We spoke with NOAA Research’s three contributing authors to the U.S. Global Change Research Program’s 3rd National Climate Assessment (NCA) released May 6, 2014 to understand their contribution to the NCA. According to the U.S. Global Change Research Program, the 3rd NCA is a compilation of scientific information on climate change from multiple sources and institutions and is a valuable resource in communicating and understanding climate change science and the impacts of climate change on the United States. The NCA will be used by federal scientists and managers, U.S. communities and citizens, and commercial businesses to improve environmental sustainability.
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Popular Research News

Dungeness crab larvae already showing effects of coastal acidification

Dungeness crab larvae already showing effects of coastal acidification Read more

Analysis of larval crab sampled from coastal waters identified examples of damage to the outer shell of numerous larval Dungeness crabs, as well as the loss of hair-like sensory structures crabs use to orient themselves to their surroundings. 

Indo-Pacific Ocean warming is changing global rainfall patterns

Indo-Pacific Ocean warming is changing global rainfall patterns Read more

New research by NOAA and a visiting scientist from India shows that warming of the Indo-Pacific Ocean is altering rainfall patterns from the tropics to the United States, contributing to declines in rainfall on the United States west and east coasts.

NOAA launches major field campaign to improve weather and climate prediction

NOAA launches major field campaign to improve weather and climate prediction Read more

Picture a calm, sunny day at a tropical beach. You look out at the ocean and in the distance a flotilla of small white clouds sails close to the waves. It’s ideal weather and typical of many days in the tropical Atlantic. However, scientists don’t fully understand how these ubiquitous clouds (a type of “shallow convective cloud”) form and impact the ocean, and it represents one of the largest uncertainties in predicting climate change.

NOAA researchers are working to make traveling in winter weather safer

Wave gliders, ocean drifters and drones to help international researchers solve key climate question

Wave gliders, ocean drifters and drones to help international researchers solve key climate question Read more

American and European scientists are deploying dozens of autonomous and remotely-piloted instrument platforms to capture simultaneous observations of the lower atmosphere and the upper ocean offshore of Barbados with unprecedented detail.

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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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