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Earth is breathing deeper: Multi-agency study reveals widening seasonal swings in CO2 in the Northern Hemisphere

Levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere rise and fall annually as plants take up the gas in spring and summer and release it in fall and winter through photosynthesis and respiration. Now the range of that cycle is growing as more CO2 is emitted from the burning of fossil fuels and other human activities, according to a study published in Science by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, with CIRES and NOAA co-authors.

Clearing up confusion on future of Colorado River flows

The Colorado River provides water for more than 30 million people. Increasing demand for that water combined with reduced flow and the looming threat of climate change have prompted concern about how to manage the basin’s water in coming decades. NOAA-funded researchers at the University of Washington and co-authors at eight institutions across the West aim to explain this wide range, and provide policymakers and the public with a framework for comparison.

New NOAA study in North Carolina may improve forecasting, lead times for dangerous storms

This month, NOAA launched a 1½-year long pilot study in North Carolina to improve understanding and forecasting of dangerous storms that can lead to flooding and economic losses. From the coastline to the mountains, state-of-the-art NOAA instrumentation is being set up in numerous locations across the state that may improve forecasting and lead-time for tropical storms and summertime thunderstorms.

Scientists working to crack key air quality and climate mysteries in U.S. Southeast

Scientists this summer are taking one of the most detailed looks ever at the natural and manmade emissions that affect air quality in the Southeast, and their movement and chemical transformations within the atmosphere. The mission should help scientists determine the origin of the fine particles and how they contribute to the haziness in the region and affect regional air quality and temperature trends.

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Popular Research News

Dungeness crab larvae already showing effects of coastal acidification

Dungeness crab larvae already showing effects of coastal acidification Read more

Analysis of larval crab sampled from coastal waters identified examples of damage to the outer shell of numerous larval Dungeness crabs, as well as the loss of hair-like sensory structures crabs use to orient themselves to their surroundings. 

Wave gliders, ocean drifters and drones to help international researchers solve key climate question

Wave gliders, ocean drifters and drones to help international researchers solve key climate question Read more

American and European scientists are deploying dozens of autonomous and remotely-piloted instrument platforms to capture simultaneous observations of the lower atmosphere and the upper ocean offshore of Barbados with unprecedented detail.

NOAA teams up with Viking to conduct and share science aboard new Great Lakes expedition voyages

NOAA teams up with Viking to conduct and share science aboard new Great Lakes expedition voyages Read more

NOAA plans to expand its research in the Great Lakes region as the agency teams up with the travel company Viking to carry scientists aboard new expedition voyages planned to begin in 2022.

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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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