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US Postal Service unveils new Earth Day stamp celebrating NOAA Climate Science

Stamp inspired by climate model showing Earth's sea surface temperatures

On April 22, 2014, the U.S. Postal Service is celebrating Earth Day by unveiling a new Forever international rate stamp inspired by a simulation of sea surface temperatures from a NOAA model of the Earth’s climate. The round stamp depicts the globe with North America in the center, surrounded by vivid bands of blue, green and red, signifying the varying temperatures of sea surface waters.

NOAA’s Upcoming Weather Forecast Model Zeros In Earlier on Severe Weather

Research behind the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh weather forecast model

Later this year, NOAA’s National Weather Service will usher into daily operations a sophisticated model called the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh, or HRRR, that will update forecasts hourly over the entire lower 48 United States at extremely sharp resolution using the latest observations from a network of ground and satellite-based sensors, radars and aircraft.

The HRRR provides forecast information at a resolution four times finer than what is currently used in hourly updated NOAA models.  This improvement in resolution from 13 to three kilometers is like giving forecasters an aerial photograph in which each pixel represents a neighborhood instead of a city.

NOAA flies through atmospheric rivers off California coast

Researchers study evolution and structure of moisture-bearing rivers in air

Scientists aboard the NOAA Gulfstream IV aircraft are flying over the Pacific Ocean off the U.S. West Coast this week to measure air pressure, temperature, humidity, wind speed and direction to help better understand atmospheric rivers - narrow conveyor belts of water vapor that can bring beneficial water supply and snowpack as well as create dangerous floods.

NOAA launches research on next generation of high performance weather, climate models

NOAA collaborates with U.S. Navy, other public and private partners to create faster, lower-cost models

NOAA and the U.S. Navy are teaming up with academic and other government scientists to design the next generation of powerful supercomputer models to predict weather, ocean conditions and regional climate change.

 

Four teams of scientists are beginning projects this month to rewrite computer models that will create faster, lower-cost, better integrated models.  These new models will take advantage of new supercomputers that use more energy efficient/lower-cost processors such as those originally developed for the video gaming industry.

New study: Rising temperatures challenge Salt Lake City’s water supply

Sensitivity study helps the city, others in the Intermountain West, plan for the future

In an example of the challenges water-strapped Western cities will face in a warming world, new research shows that every degree Fahrenheit of warming in the Salt Lake City region could mean a 1.8 to 6.5 percent drop in the annual flow of streams that provide water to the city. 
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Popular Research News

Study: Reducing human-caused air pollution in North America & Europe brings surprise result: more hurricanes

Study: Reducing human-caused air pollution in North America & Europe brings surprise result: more hurricanes Read more

A new NOAA study published today in the journal Science Advances about four decades of tropical cyclones reveals the surprising result that reducing particulate air pollution in Europe and North America has contributed to an increase in the number of tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic basin and a decrease in the number of these storms in the Southern Hemisphere. The study also found that the growth of particulate pollution in Asia has contributed to fewer tropical cyclones in the western North Pacific basin. 

Greenhouse gas pollution trapped 49% more heat in 2021 than in 1990, NOAA finds

Greenhouse gas pollution trapped 49% more heat in 2021 than in 1990, NOAA finds Read more

The Annual Greenhouse Gas Index serves as a measure of global society's progress - or lack of progress - in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Projected increase in space travel may damage ozone layer

Projected increase in space travel may damage ozone layer Read more

Scientists from NOAA and The Aerospace Corp. modeled the climate response of the stratosphere to increased future emissions of black carbon from rockets burning kerosene fuel.

NOAA and Saildrone launch seven hurricane-tracking surface drones

NOAA and Saildrone launch seven hurricane-tracking surface drones Read more

In partnership with NOAA, Saildrone Inc. is deploying seven ocean drones to collect data from hurricanes during the 2022 hurricane season with the goal of improving hurricane forecasting.  For the first year, two saildrones will track hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico.

Study validates accuracy of NOAA’s smoke forecasting model during the Camp Fire

Study validates accuracy of NOAA’s smoke forecasting model during the Camp Fire Read more

A research team led by scientists from the University of California Berkeley and NOAA found that HRRR-Smoke accurately predicted the intensification of smoke pollution from the Camp Fire.

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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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