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Ocean explorers make discoveries in deep sea canyons off U.S. Northeast

Ocean explorers in July on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer discovered a wide diversity of seafloor features and communities of life in the largely unexplored deep-sea canyons off the northeast U.S. coast. Now through August 16, as the expedition continues, the public can join the mission as “citizen scientists,” at oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos, to see live seafloor video and listen as scientists discuss their observations in real time. 

Like butter: Study explains surprising acceleration of Greenland’s inland ice

Surface meltwater draining through cracks in an ice sheet can warm the sheet from the inside, softening the ice and letting it flow faster, according to a new study. During the last decade, researchers have captured compelling evidence of accelerating ice flow at terminal regions, or “snouts,” of Greenland glaciers as they flow into the ocean along the western coast.

NOAA real-time beach and water quality data now available for Lake St. Clair

Independence Day is right around the corner, and Michigan's Lake St. Clair residents and tourists are gearing up for a holiday weekend filled with fishing, swimming and boating activities. Beach managers can now view NOAA water quality predictions in real-time, instead of waiting 24 hours as before, to make timely decisions to safeguard public health and avoid unnecessary beach closures.

Clearing up confusion on future of Colorado River flows

The Colorado River provides water for more than 30 million people. Increasing demand for that water combined with reduced flow and the looming threat of climate change have prompted concern about how to manage the basin’s water in coming decades. NOAA-funded researchers at the University of Washington and co-authors at eight institutions across the West aim to explain this wide range, and provide policymakers and the public with a framework for comparison.

New NOAA study in North Carolina may improve forecasting, lead times for dangerous storms

This month, NOAA launched a 1½-year long pilot study in North Carolina to improve understanding and forecasting of dangerous storms that can lead to flooding and economic losses. From the coastline to the mountains, state-of-the-art NOAA instrumentation is being set up in numerous locations across the state that may improve forecasting and lead-time for tropical storms and summertime thunderstorms.

Scientists working to crack key air quality and climate mysteries in U.S. Southeast

Scientists this summer are taking one of the most detailed looks ever at the natural and manmade emissions that affect air quality in the Southeast, and their movement and chemical transformations within the atmosphere. The mission should help scientists determine the origin of the fine particles and how they contribute to the haziness in the region and affect regional air quality and temperature trends.

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Popular Research News

A Message from Craig McLean: Hurricane Dorian and Exceptional Service

A Message from Craig McLean: Hurricane Dorian and Exceptional Service Read more

NOAA Research Assistant Administrator Craig McLean's message to colleagues, dated Monday, September 9th, regarding Hurricane Dorian and its wide-ranging impacts

A Year Locked in Ice

A Year Locked in Ice Read more

An expedition to the central Arctic will give scientists the first opportunity to study the dramatic changes sweeping across the top of the world for an entire year. 

New NOAA app brings earth and space animations to your phone

New NOAA app brings earth and space animations to your phone Read more

NOAA's SOS Explorer Mobile, an app for personal mobile devices, tells earth science stories by playing visually stunning movies on a virtual globe.

Old weather “time machine” opens a treasure trove for researchers

Old weather “time machine” opens a treasure trove for researchers Read more

https://cires.colorado.edu/A NOAA-funded research team ha published an update the 20th Century Reanalysis Project, a dauntingly complex, high-resolution, four-dimensional reconstruction of the global climate that estimates what the weather was for every day back to 1836.

NOAA is developing underwater robots to map, measure toxicity of Great Lakes algal blooms

NOAA is developing underwater robots to map, measure toxicity of Great Lakes algal blooms Read more

Two underwater robots will be gliding throughout the western Lake Erie basin this week, as NOAA and its partners at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) test technology to autonomously monitor and measure the toxicity of harmful algal blooms in the Great Lakes.

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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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