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National Sea Grant Aquaculture Initiative: 2020 Update

Over the past several years, Sea Grant has funded many research projects. Last year, Sea Grant established several collaborative teams focused on bringing together diverse aquaculture stakeholders, advancing specific aspects of the industry, and informing future national investments by Sea Grant. Funding for existing projects is ongoing. This year, Sea Grant provided supplemental funds to each of the state Sea Grant programs to expand work and take on new aquaculture projects at the local level. National investments also included rapid response funds to each Sea Grant state program to address aquaculture needs related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Monitoring Change in the Arctic

Expedition to the U.S. Arctic keeps in place some vital research

While NOAA has had to cancel many of its planned research surveys in Alaska, it has been able to conduct a number of scaled-back research surveys in 2020. One such survey that will be finishing up this week is in the Arctic and was conducted on board NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson to collect critical data supporting a long time series involving many scientific partners.

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Popular Research News

Fragrant consumer products a key source of ozone-forming pollution in New York City

Fragrant consumer products a key source of ozone-forming pollution in New York City Read more

New research from NOAA finds that fragrant personal care products - the stuff that makes you smell good - are now responsible for a significant amount of the ozone pollution known as smog that plagues major urban areas.

Low-oxygen waters off Washington, Oregon coasts risk becoming large 'dead zones'

Low-oxygen waters off Washington, Oregon coasts risk becoming large 'dead zones' Read more

A large area of poorly oxygenated water is growing off the coast of Washington and Oregon. Scientists say oxygen levels may fall low enough to create "dead zones." 

Deforestation, warming flip part of Amazon forest from carbon sink to source

Deforestation, warming flip part of Amazon forest from carbon sink to source Read more

New results from a nine-year research project in the eastern Amazon rainforest finds that significant deforestation in eastern and southeastern Brazil turned what was once a forest that absorbed carbon dioxide into a source of planet-warming carbon dioxide emissions.

Earth has two different stratospheres, and aviation may be to blame

Earth has two different stratospheres, and aviation may be to blame Read more

Findings of a new study of aerosols in the remote atmosphere finds that the northern stratosphere is significantlly more polluted than the south. Analysis of the aerosols suggests aviation is to blame. 

Human activities responsible for rapid increase in Earth's heat

Human activities responsible for rapid increase in Earth's heat Read more

A new study by Princeton University and NOAA researchers has found clear evidence of human influence on Earth’s climate in the past two decades of satellite measurements. “Human activity strongly influenced the positive trend in Earth's energy imbalance, causing a significant increase in the heat stored in the planet,” said Shiv Priyam Raghuraman, the lead researcher on the study. 

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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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