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New mission for the Global Hawk

NOAA is testing data collected by unmanned aircraft to improve weather forecast operations

For the last five years, NOAA has teamed up with NASA to fly NASA’s Global Hawk unmanned aircraft to get an inside look at how hurricanes form and intensify over the Atlantic. The NASA-led project called the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel mission is demonstrating the ability of the Global Hawk to fly over hurricanes to gather continuous weather data on flights that are longer in duration than possible with manned aircraft. In the next three years, NOAA will take the next step with the Global Hawk, leading a new experiment and continuing its important collaboration with NASA. Drawing on technology and expertise honed in the current mission, NOAA will assess the feasibility of regular operations of Global Hawk to improve day-to-day forecasts of severe storms forming over the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic oceans.

Summer of research to improve hurricane forecasting

Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 helps support research to improve severe weather forecasting

This summer, NOAA scientists and partners are launching a number of new unmanned aircraft and water vehicles to collect weather information as part of a coordinated effort to improve hurricane forecasts.  

Several of these research projects and other NOAA led efforts to improve hurricane forecasting were made possible, in part, because of the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013. The act was passed by Congress and signed by the President in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. It provides $60 billion in funding to multiple agencies for disaster relief. NOAA received $309.7 million to provide technical assistance to those states with coastal and fishery impacts from Sandy, and to improve weather forecasting and weather research and predictive capability to help future preparation, response and recovery from similar events.

Colorado report: climate change projected to reduce water in streams, increase water needs for crops, cities

Rising temperatures will tend to reduce the amount of water in many of Colorado’s streams and rivers, melt mountain snowpack earlier in the spring, and increase the water needed by thirsty crops and cities, according to the new report, “Climate Change in Colorado: A Synthesis to Support Water Resources Management and Adaptation,” which updates and expands upon an initial report released in 2008.

Lightning experts converge on Oklahoma to discuss latest research

NOAA and University of Oklahoma host International conference June 15-20

More than 200 national and international lightning experts are gathering this week in Norman, Oklahoma, for what organizers have called “the most important international conference on atmospheric electricity in the world.”  Held every four years, the 2014 International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity is co-hosted by NOAA’s National Severe Storms Laboratory and the University of Oklahoma’s College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences, and features the latest research on lightning and other electrical phenomena in the atmosphere.

Tropical cyclone ‘maximum intensity’ is shifting toward the poles

As tropical cyclones move into higher latitudes, regions closer to the equator may experience reduced risk, while higher latitudes experience increased risk.

Over the past 30 years, the location where tropical cyclones reach maximum intensity has been shifting toward the poles in both the northern and southern hemispheres at a rate of about 35 miles, or one-half a degree of latitude, per decade according to a new study, The Poleward Migration of the Location of Tropical Cyclone Maximum Intensity, published tomorrow in Nature.

 

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Popular Research News

Study: Reducing human-caused air pollution in North America & Europe brings surprise result: more hurricanes

Study: Reducing human-caused air pollution in North America & Europe brings surprise result: more hurricanes Read more

A new NOAA study published today in the journal Science Advances about four decades of tropical cyclones reveals the surprising result that reducing particulate air pollution in Europe and North America has contributed to an increase in the number of tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic basin and a decrease in the number of these storms in the Southern Hemisphere. The study also found that the growth of particulate pollution in Asia has contributed to fewer tropical cyclones in the western North Pacific basin. 

Greenhouse gas pollution trapped 49% more heat in 2021 than in 1990, NOAA finds

Greenhouse gas pollution trapped 49% more heat in 2021 than in 1990, NOAA finds Read more

The Annual Greenhouse Gas Index serves as a measure of global society's progress - or lack of progress - in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Projected increase in space travel may damage ozone layer

Projected increase in space travel may damage ozone layer Read more

Scientists from NOAA and The Aerospace Corp. modeled the climate response of the stratosphere to increased future emissions of black carbon from rockets burning kerosene fuel.

NOAA and Saildrone launch seven hurricane-tracking surface drones

NOAA and Saildrone launch seven hurricane-tracking surface drones Read more

In partnership with NOAA, Saildrone Inc. is deploying seven ocean drones to collect data from hurricanes during the 2022 hurricane season with the goal of improving hurricane forecasting.  For the first year, two saildrones will track hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico.

Study validates accuracy of NOAA’s smoke forecasting model during the Camp Fire

Study validates accuracy of NOAA’s smoke forecasting model during the Camp Fire Read more

A research team led by scientists from the University of California Berkeley and NOAA found that HRRR-Smoke accurately predicted the intensification of smoke pollution from the Camp Fire.

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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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