Search

Stay Connected

NOAA Research News

NOAA report highlights 2020 climate, weather, ocean research

Launching uncrewed systems to monitor climate and ecosystem changes in the U.S. Arctic, sequencing the genome for endangered marine species, and improving weather forecasts with advances in regional models — these are just a few of NOAA’s scientific achievements in 2020. The newly released 2020 NOAA Science Report highlights the ways these accomplishments — and many more — provide the foundation for vital services that Americans use every day. 

Climate-driven shifts in deep Lake Michigan water temperatures signal the loss of winter

Changes foreshadow impacts on lake ecosystems, fisheries

Climate change is causing significant impacts on the Great Lakes and the surrounding region. As the largest surface freshwater system in the world, the Great Lakes have an enormous impact, seen and unseen, on the more than 34 million people who live within their collective basin. Because of their unique response to environmental conditions, Earth’s large lakes are considered by scientists as key sentinels of climate change. A long-term study published in Nature Communications today from NOAA reveals a warming trend in deepwater temperatures that foreshadows profound ecological change on the horizon. While less visible than the loss in ice cover and increasing lake surface temperatures, this latest index of climate change adds to the growing evidence of climate change impacts in the region. 

Congress reauthorizes law supporting partnerships to advance ocean science

Congress voted on January 1, 2021 to reauthorize and strengthen the National Oceanographic Partnership Program, a 23-year old program created by Congress to facilitate ocean-related partnerships between federal agencies, academia and industry to advance ocean science research and education.The reauthorization passed Congress as an amendment included in Section 1055 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021

Congress reauthorizes NOAA Sea Grant through 2025

The National Sea Grant College Act was reauthorized and amended by Congress and signed by President Donald J. Trump on December 18, 2020. The reauthorization, titled the “National Sea Grant College Program Amendments Act of 2020,” includes several updates to Sea Grant’s authorizing legislation. The Act serves as a guiding framework upon which Sea Grant operates and serves America’s coastal and Great Lakes communities.

RSS
12345678Last

Popular Research News

Fragrant consumer products a key source of ozone-forming pollution in New York City

Fragrant consumer products a key source of ozone-forming pollution in New York City Read more

New research from NOAA finds that fragrant personal care products - the stuff that makes you smell good - are now responsible for a significant amount of the ozone pollution known as smog that plagues major urban areas.

Low-oxygen waters off Washington, Oregon coasts risk becoming large 'dead zones'

Low-oxygen waters off Washington, Oregon coasts risk becoming large 'dead zones' Read more

A large area of poorly oxygenated water is growing off the coast of Washington and Oregon. Scientists say oxygen levels may fall low enough to create "dead zones." 

Deforestation, warming flip part of Amazon forest from carbon sink to source

Deforestation, warming flip part of Amazon forest from carbon sink to source Read more

New results from a nine-year research project in the eastern Amazon rainforest finds that significant deforestation in eastern and southeastern Brazil turned what was once a forest that absorbed carbon dioxide into a source of planet-warming carbon dioxide emissions.

Earth has two different stratospheres, and aviation may be to blame

Earth has two different stratospheres, and aviation may be to blame Read more

Findings of a new study of aerosols in the remote atmosphere finds that the northern stratosphere is significantlly more polluted than the south. Analysis of the aerosols suggests aviation is to blame. 

Human activities responsible for rapid increase in Earth's heat

Human activities responsible for rapid increase in Earth's heat Read more

A new study by Princeton University and NOAA researchers has found clear evidence of human influence on Earth’s climate in the past two decades of satellite measurements. “Human activity strongly influenced the positive trend in Earth's energy imbalance, causing a significant increase in the heat stored in the planet,” said Shiv Priyam Raghuraman, the lead researcher on the study. 

RSS
«September 2021»
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
2930311234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293012
3456789

OAR HEADQUARTERS

Phone: 301-713-2458
Address: 1315 East-West Highway Silver Spring, MD 20910

Stay Connected

ABOUT US

Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

CONTACT US

Can't Find What You Need?
Send Feedback
Copyright 2018 by NOAA Terms Of Use Privacy Statement
Back To Top