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Study: northern coastal waters are more vulnerable to acidification

Acidified ocean waters can disorient some fish species

NOAA and partner scientists speaking Friday, August 17, at the Goldschmidt annual international conference on geochemistry reported their research is finding that coastal waters and river estuaries are more vulnerable to ocean acidification than offshore waters. These waters are more severely affected by ocean acidification because they receive fresh water runoff that contributes to higher levels of dissolved carbon dioxide.

Tracking change in the Arctic

Editor's note: This is the second in a series Dispatches from the Arctic on the August science cruise by NOAA and partner scientists aboard the U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker Healy. Today's post is from Meredith LaValley of the Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee and the NOAA Communications team.

NOAA Arctic explorers sail North

This is the first in a series Dispatches from the Arctic on the August science cruise by NOAA and partner scientists aboard the Coast Guard icebreaker Healy. Today's post is from Emily Osborne, Arctic Program Manager at NOAA Research,  Janet Hsiao, NOAA John Knauss Sea Grant fellow, and Meredith LaValley of the Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee.

When noise becomes signal

Unusual California precipitation over last two winters could have been predicted

Last spring, Governor Jerry Brown declared an end to California’s historic drought that caused over $5 billion in damage to agriculture as well as substantial impacts to fisheries, infrastructure, human health, and vegetation. The drought was not only severe, but it also spanned the winters of 2015-16 and 2016-17, which had unusual and unexpected precipitation that affected the drought’s evolution.

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Popular Research News

NOAA-Funded Expedition Captures Rare Footage of Giant Squid in the Gulf of Mexico

RISING EMISSIONS DRIVE GREENHOUSE GAS INDEX INCREASE

RISING EMISSIONS DRIVE GREENHOUSE GAS INDEX INCREASE Read more

Record levels of greenhouse gas pollution continued to increase humanity’s impact on the atmosphere’s heat-trapping capacity during 2018, according to a yearly analysis released by NOAA scientists today.

New engine is driving NOAA’s flagship weather forecast model

New engine is driving NOAA’s flagship weather forecast model Read more

As NOAA launches a major upgrade of its flagship weather forecast model today, an important part is the Global Forecast System’s new dynamical core. The story of how scientists developed the dynamical core or engine for the model is a view into how scientific invention works.

Great Lakes water levels predicted to reach record highs this year

Great Lakes water levels predicted to reach record highs this year Read more

Several Great Lakes are expected to reach record high water levels in the next six months, thanks to above average precipitation in the watershed and large amounts of runoff this year. 

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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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