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New study: Dust, warming portend dry future for the Colorado River

Land management efforts could help protect snowpacks, water from a warmer future

Reducing the amount of desert dust swept onto snowy Rocky Mountain peaks could help Western water managers deal with the challenges of a warmer future, according to a new study led by researchers at NOAA’s Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado Boulder.

New study: Rising temperatures challenge Salt Lake City’s water supply

Sensitivity study helps the city, others in the Intermountain West, plan for the future

In an example of the challenges water-strapped Western cities will face in a warming world, new research shows that every degree Fahrenheit of warming in the Salt Lake City region could mean a 1.8 to 6.5 percent drop in the annual flow of streams that provide water to the city. 

NOAA Sea Grant awards $1.8 million to Sandy-hit states to better understand public response to coastal storm threats

NOAA Sea Grant this month announced $1.8 million in grant awards to Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey to enhance the American public’s ability to effectively plan, prepare and respond to natural disasters when they strike—particularly for major storms like Sandy, which resulted in 140 fatalities last year.

Encouraging information from this year’s observations of the Antarctic ozone hole

For nearly 50 years, scientists with NOAA have launched high-altitude balloons from the South Pole, to understand why a hole was forming in the protective ozone layer high in the atmosphere. Now, organizations around the world track the infamous ozone hole through these ballon-sondes, satellite measurements and ground instruments.

Water vapor in the upper atmosphere amplifies global warming, says new study

A new study shows that water vapor high in the sky and the temperature at the Earth’s surface are linked in a “feedback loop” that further warms our climate. Published today, this study gives the first estimate of the size of the feedback’s effect, which may help researchers improve modeling to better understand climate change.

NOAA, Aquarium of the Pacific report on the future of American ocean exploration

More than 100 explorers, scientists, government officials, academics, and industry leaders who attended the inaugural ‘Ocean Exploration 2020: A National Forum,’ in July, have proposed the future of American ocean exploration.  NOAA and the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, Calif., hosted the Forum, and released a report this week examining the future of ocean exploration through a coordinated federal effort involving multiple agencies in collaboration with the private sector.

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Popular Research News

A Message from Craig McLean: Hurricane Dorian and Exceptional Service

A Message from Craig McLean: Hurricane Dorian and Exceptional Service Read more

NOAA Research Assistant Administrator Craig McLean's message to colleagues, dated Monday, September 9th, regarding Hurricane Dorian and its wide-ranging impacts

A Year Locked in Ice

A Year Locked in Ice Read more

An expedition to the central Arctic will give scientists the first opportunity to study the dramatic changes sweeping across the top of the world for an entire year. 

Old weather “time machine” opens a treasure trove for researchers

Old weather “time machine” opens a treasure trove for researchers Read more

https://cires.colorado.edu/A NOAA-funded research team ha published an update the 20th Century Reanalysis Project, a dauntingly complex, high-resolution, four-dimensional reconstruction of the global climate that estimates what the weather was for every day back to 1836.

Heat waves could increase substantially in size by mid-century, says new study

Heat waves could increase substantially in size by mid-century, says new study Read more

Our planet has been baking under the sun this summer as temperatures reached the hottest ever recorded and heat waves spread across the globe. While the climate continues to warm, scientists expect the frequency and intensity of heat waves to increase. However, a commonly overlooked aspect is the spatial size of heat waves, despite its important implications.

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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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