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NOAA Research News

Research physicist named director of Earth System Research Lab Chemical Sciences Division

Craig McLean, the acting assistant administrator for NOAA’s Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, announced Wednesday, December 24, that David Fahey, Ph.D., has been selected as the new director of the Earth System Research Laboratory Chemical Sciences Division (CSD), in Boulder, Colorado, effective December 28, 2014.

New study finds Alaskans familiar with ocean acidification, not aware of risks to fisheries

New research published in Marine Policy from the first Alaska-focused study on public understanding and awareness of ocean acidification risk shows that Alaskans are three times more aware of ocean acidification than Americans in general.  However, Alaskans have difficulty seeing ocean acidification as an immediate risk, and the direct risks to Alaska’s fisheries are still not well understood. The research, “Gauging perceptions of ocean acidification in Alaska,” can be read online.


Shock of Indian Ocean tsunami fuels decade of research progress

New generation of warning products increase tsunami preparedness

Nearly 10 years ago, the world woke the day after Christmas to news of the most deadly tsunami in recorded history. Triggered by an underwater earthquake, the Indian Ocean tsunami of December 26, 2004, took the lives of nearly 240,000 unwarned people in four hours and displaced 1.7 million people in over 14 countries.

Over the last 10 years, NOAA scientists have worked to dramatically improve tsunami warning and forecasts that can and have helped the nation and the world.

NOAA and partners document surge in Great Lakes water levels

Levels expected to stay above-average through winter and spring of 2015

Scientists at the Army Corps of Engineers, Environment Canada, and NOAA recently documented a record-setting surge in water levels on Lakes Superior and Michigan-Huron that began in January 2013, and has continued through November 2014. The United States and Canadian federal agencies expect water levels to stay near or above average on all of the Great Lakes over the next six months. 

Researchers offer new insights into predicting future droughts in California

Natural cycles, sea surface temperatures found to be main drivers in ongoing event

According to a new NOAA-sponsored study, natural oceanic and atmospheric patterns are the primary drivers behind California's ongoing drought. A high pressure ridge off the West Coast (typical of historic droughts) prevailed for three winters, blocking important wet season storms, with ocean surface temperature patterns making such a ridge much more likely. Typically, the winter season in California provides the state with a majority of its annual snow and rainfall that replenish water supplies for communities and ecosystems.

NOAA scientists to share research and resiliency tools at international climate meeting

Presentations by Amanda McCarty and Libby Jewett to be web-streamed live from Lima, Peru

Several NOAA scientists will present information on climate research and new tools to build greater resiliency to climate change at a meeting on the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Lima, Peru, that will run from December 1-12.
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Popular Research News

A Message from Craig McLean: Hurricane Dorian and Exceptional Service

A Message from Craig McLean: Hurricane Dorian and Exceptional Service Read more

NOAA Research Assistant Administrator Craig McLean's message to colleagues, dated Monday, September 9th, regarding Hurricane Dorian and its wide-ranging impacts

A Year Locked in Ice

A Year Locked in Ice Read more

An expedition to the central Arctic will give scientists the first opportunity to study the dramatic changes sweeping across the top of the world for an entire year. 

Old weather “time machine” opens a treasure trove for researchers

Old weather “time machine” opens a treasure trove for researchers Read more

https://cires.colorado.edu/A NOAA-funded research team ha published an update the 20th Century Reanalysis Project, a dauntingly complex, high-resolution, four-dimensional reconstruction of the global climate that estimates what the weather was for every day back to 1836.

Heat waves could increase substantially in size by mid-century, says new study

Heat waves could increase substantially in size by mid-century, says new study Read more

Our planet has been baking under the sun this summer as temperatures reached the hottest ever recorded and heat waves spread across the globe. While the climate continues to warm, scientists expect the frequency and intensity of heat waves to increase. However, a commonly overlooked aspect is the spatial size of heat waves, despite its important implications.

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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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