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Great Lakes water levels at or above average for next 6 months

NOAA and Army Corps issue forecast, consider El Niño potential impact

Scientists from NOAA, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Environment Canada have issued a six-month forecast for water levels to be at or above average on Lake Superior, Michigan, Huron, and Erie into spring of 2016. Lake Ontario water levels are expected to remain close to monthly averages. However, the impacts of the anticipated strong El Niño and other atmospheric anomalies on the forecast are difficult to predict.

HFC greenhouse gases: a tale of two (or more) futures

New research projects greenhouse effect from substances that replaced ozone-depleting products

new paper appearing online in Atmospheric Environment  coauthored by researchers at NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory looked at the climate implications of various proposals for future HFC use that are being discussed this week under the United Nations Montreal Protocol, the global agreement that protects the ozone layer. 

Annual Antarctic ozone hole larger and formed later in 2015

The 2015 Antarctic ozone hole area was larger and formed later than in recent years, according to scientists from NOAA and NASA.

On Oct. 2, 2015, the ozone hole expanded to its peak of 28.2 million square kilometers (10.9 million square miles), an area larger than the continent of North America. Throughout October, the hole remained large and set many area daily records.

Warming waters a major factor in Gulf of Maine cod collapse

New study shows how warming complicates fisheries management

For centuries, cod was the backbone of New England’s fisheries and a key species in the Gulf of Maine ecosystem. Today, cod stocks in the gulf are on the verge of collapse, hovering at 3-4 percent of sustainable levels. Even setting tighter limits on fishing has failed to slow this rapid decline. Now a new

 report in Science concludes that rapid warming of Gulf of Maine waters— warming in the last decade faster than in 99 percent of the global ocean —has reduced the capacity of cod to rebound from overfishing, leading to collapse.

NOAA’s Ko Barrett elected vice chair of international climate science panel

Ko Barrett (left) joins Youba Sokana of Mali and Thelma Krug as IPCC vice chairs

The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) elected NOAA’s Ko Barrett to serve as one of three vice chairs for the international body. The IPCC was created to review and assess the most recent scientific, technical, and socio-economic information produced worldwide that is relevant to the understanding of climate change. 

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Popular Research News

Hurricane hunter lands at NOAA's Boulder labs

Hurricane hunter lands at NOAA's Boulder labs Read more

The former Chief of Operations at the NOAA Aircraft Operations Center in Lakeland, Florida, pilot and NOAA Corps CAPT Catherine A. Martin is now the Executive Director of NOAA Boulder Laboratories.

Drifting buoys track Hurricane Michael in the Gulf of Mexico

Drifting buoys track Hurricane Michael in the Gulf of Mexico Read more

On Monday night, October 8, 2018, 10 drifting buoys were thrown from the hatch of a U.S. Air Force Hurricane Hunter into the Gulf of Mexico so they could be in front of Hurricane Michael to help with hurricane forecasting.

NOAA funding research effort to develop global aerosol map

NOAA funding research effort to develop global aerosol map Read more

The University of Colorado has been awarded funding for development of an improved global map of smoke, dust and other aerosol particles.

Ozone hole modest despite conditions ripe for depletion

Ozone hole modest despite conditions ripe for depletion Read more

Weather conditions were ripe for a big ozone hole this year. But declining levels of ozone-depleting chemicals kept it to near-average size.

Small unmanned aircraft flies into rapidly intensifying Hurricane Michael

Small unmanned aircraft flies into rapidly intensifying Hurricane Michael Read more

NOAA scientists flew multiple missions into Hurricane Michael in the days before landfall, closely observing the rapid intensification of the storm. Their tools included a small unmanned aircraft, called the Coyote, which flew into the strongest winds of the eyewall as the storm intensified to a category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson scale.

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The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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