Saturday, February 24, 2018
 

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Milky Way now hidden from one ­third of humanity

US and Italian scientists create new world atlas of light pollution

Monica.Allen 0 20952
The Milky Way, the brilliant river of stars that has dominated the night sky and human imaginations since time immemorial, is but a faded memory to one third of humanity and 80 percent of Americans, according to a new global atlas of light pollution produced by Italian and American scientists.

NOAA invests $4.5 million to improve ocean observations for weather and climate prediction

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NOAA’s Climate Program Office announced today that it is investing $4.5 million in four projects to test technology designed to improve the Tropical Pacific Observing System, an array of buoys in the tropical Pacific used to better understand El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), how it develops, and how it affects Earth’s weather.

Scientists deploy autonomous sailing vessels to study whales, fish and seals

Unmanned technologies open new frontier in ocean science

Monica.Allen 0 15315

NOAA Research and NOAA Fisheries have teamed up with academic and private sector partners to test innovative technologies that, if successful, will enable researchers to gather information on ocean conditions and marine species in remote areas of the ocean that are costly to reach and difficult to study.  

North Dakota’s Bakken oil and gas field leaking 275,000 tons of methane per year

Monica.Allen 0 18724

The Bakken oil and gas field is leaking a lot of methane, but less than some satellites report, and less than the latest Environmental Protection Agency inventory for petroleum systems, according to the researchers’ calculations. That's the finding of the first field study measuring emissions of this potent greenhouse gas from the Bakken, which spans parts of North Dakota and Montana. The work was published today in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres

Leftover warm water in Pacific Ocean fueled massive El Niño

Monica.Allen 0 20213

Editor's note: The American Geophysical Union wrote the following release on new NOAA research publishing in Geophysical Research Letters.

A new study by NOAA's Aaron Levine and Michael Mcphaden provides insight into how the current El Niño, one of the strongest on record, formed in the Pacific Ocean. The new research finds easterly winds in the tropical Pacific Ocean stalled a potential El Niño in 2014 and left a swath of warm water in the central Pacific. The presence of that warm water stacked the deck for a monster El Niño to occur in 2015, according to the study’s authors.

Flying high to measure gravity: humans optional

Unmanned plane gathers gravity information to make nation more resilient

Monica.Allen 0 6060
NOAA's Unmanned Aircraft Systems Program worked through NOAA's Small Business Innovation Research Program  to test an unmanned aircraft system for gravity measurements. SBIR funds high-risk, high-reward projects that not only help NOAA to meet its mission, but open up new markets for industry. 

Measuring variations in gravity helps scientists create a height measurement system based on where water will flow. These measurements will help prepare for floods, sea level rise, and other emergencies, making our coastal communities more resilient, and aid a number of diverse industries such as agriculture, construction, transportation, and urban planning.

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