Saturday, February 24, 2018
 

All News

Scientists test a new tool to improve local precipitation forecasts

Monica.Allen 0 13263

A new weather forecasting tool could soon find itself part of the day-to-day operations of NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS).

The instrument, called Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, or AERI, measures temperature, water vapor and trace gases (like ozone, carbon monoxide and methane) in the lowest layer of Earth’s atmosphere, the troposphere. Now, an AERI project led by Tim Wagner, a scientist with NOAA’s Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, has received funding through NOAA’s Joint Technology Transfer Program.

Study shows ocean acidification is two-front assault on coral reefs

Monica.Allen 0 13169

Scientists studying coral reefs in volcanically acidified water of the southwestern Pacific Ocean measured a net loss of coral reef skeletons due to increased bio-erosion, according to new research by NOAA, the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS) and Australian scientists. 

Q&A: Is Arctic warming fueling severe winter weather in the mid-latitudes?

Monica.Allen 0 14008

We caught up with James Overland, oceanographer at NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, to hear about his latest research on whether Arctic warming is fueling more severe winter weather in the mid-latitudes, the temperate zone of the Earth between the tropics and the Arctic, and the part of the United States where most Americans live.

NOAA invests $6 million to speed use of new technologies to improve forecasts

Technology transfer initiative focuses on improving severe weather forecasts

Monica.Allen 0 6967

NOAA Research today announced $6 million in funding to get scientific and technological advances from the government and academia to NOAA’s National Weather Service (NWS) more rapidly, improving severe weather and water hazards forecasting.


Study finds fossil fuel methane emissions greater than previously estimated

But energy development is not responsible for global methane uptick

Monica.Allen 0 7182

Methane emissions from fossil fuel development around the world are up to 60 percent greater than estimated by previous studies, according to new research led by scientists from NOAA and CIRES. The study found that fossil fuel activities contribute between 132 million and 165 million tons of the 623 million tons of methane emitted by all sources every year. That’s about 20 to 25 percent of total global methane emissions, and 20 to 60 percent more than previous studies estimated.


New tool helps urban communities build resilience to climate change

Monica.Allen 0 4641
Our nation’s city planners, and business and community leaders have been grappling with weather- and climate-related impacts for decades. Now they have a set of tools to help them plan and prepare: The Built Environment section of the U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit is designed to help address a wide range of risks facing cities and towns.
12345678910Last

Oceanic & Atmospheric Research Headquarters

1315 East-West Highway | Silver Spring, MD 20910 | 301-713-2458