Thursday, February 22, 2018
 

Western drought brings Lake Mead to lowest level since it was built

Rainwatch remote monitoring program helps West African nations adapt to seasonal swings in weather

NOAA-funded rainfall monitoring program and U.K.-funded organization combine to address need

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Knowing when, where and what to grow or graze animals can be the difference between a bumper harvest and facing starvation.  Rainwatch provides monsoon rainfall data in real time from monitoring stations and tracks the key seasonal attributes important for food production. 

Earth is breathing deeper: Multi-agency study reveals widening seasonal swings in CO2 in the Northern Hemisphere

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Levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere rise and fall annually as plants take up the gas in spring and summer and release it in fall and winter through photosynthesis and respiration. Now the range of that cycle is growing as more CO2 is emitted from the burning of fossil fuels and other human activities, according to a study published in Science by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, with CIRES and NOAA co-authors.

CIRES, NOAA observe significant methane leaks in a Utah natural gas field

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On a perfect winter day in Utah’s Uintah County in 2012, CIRES scientists and NOAA colleagues tested out a new way to measure methane emissions from a natural gas production field. Their results, accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters, constitute a proof-of-concept that could help both researchers and regulators better determine how much of the greenhouse gas and other air pollutants leak from oil and gas fields. 

Ocean explorers make discoveries in deep sea canyons off U.S. Northeast

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Ocean explorers in July on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer discovered a wide diversity of seafloor features and communities of life in the largely unexplored deep-sea canyons off the northeast U.S. coast. Now through August 16, as the expedition continues, the public can join the mission as “citizen scientists,” at oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos, to see live seafloor video and listen as scientists discuss their observations in real time. 

Greenhouse gases continue climbing; 2012 a record year

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NOAA’s updated Annual Greenhouse Gas Index (AGGI), which measures the direct climate influence of many heat-trapping gases like carbon dioxide and methane, shows 2012 continued the steady upward trend that began with the Industrial Revolution of the 1880s.  Last year, CO2 at the peak of its cycle reached 400 ppm for one month at all eight Arctic sites for the first time.

Like butter: Study explains surprising acceleration of Greenland’s inland ice

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Surface meltwater draining through cracks in an ice sheet can warm the sheet from the inside, softening the ice and letting it flow faster, according to a new study. During the last decade, researchers have captured compelling evidence of accelerating ice flow at terminal regions, or “snouts,” of Greenland glaciers as they flow into the ocean along the western coast.

NOAA real-time beach and water quality data now available for Lake St. Clair

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Independence Day is right around the corner, and Michigan's Lake St. Clair residents and tourists are gearing up for a holiday weekend filled with fishing, swimming and boating activities. Beach managers can now view NOAA water quality predictions in real-time, instead of waiting 24 hours as before, to make timely decisions to safeguard public health and avoid unnecessary beach closures.

Clearing up confusion on future of Colorado River flows

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The Colorado River provides water for more than 30 million people. Increasing demand for that water combined with reduced flow and the looming threat of climate change have prompted concern about how to manage the basin’s water in coming decades. NOAA-funded researchers at the University of Washington and co-authors at eight institutions across the West aim to explain this wide range, and provide policymakers and the public with a framework for comparison.

New NOAA study in North Carolina may improve forecasting, lead times for dangerous storms

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This month, NOAA launched a 1½-year long pilot study in North Carolina to improve understanding and forecasting of dangerous storms that can lead to flooding and economic losses. From the coastline to the mountains, state-of-the-art NOAA instrumentation is being set up in numerous locations across the state that may improve forecasting and lead-time for tropical storms and summertime thunderstorms.

Scientists working to crack key air quality and climate mysteries in U.S. Southeast

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Scientists this summer are taking one of the most detailed looks ever at the natural and manmade emissions that affect air quality in the Southeast, and their movement and chemical transformations within the atmosphere. The mission should help scientists determine the origin of the fine particles and how they contribute to the haziness in the region and affect regional air quality and temperature trends.

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