Thursday, March 22, 2018

Arctic Symposium address by Dr. Jane Lubchenco

Mining weather data from Civil War-era Navy logbooks

Old weather data helps scientists understand our changing climate

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A new grant will let a University of Washington-based project add a new fleet to its quest to learn more about past climate from the records of long-gone mariners. The UW is among the winners of the 2017 “Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives” awards, announced earlier this month by the Washington, D.C.-based Council on Library and Information Resources. Kevin Wood, a research scientist with the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, a research center operated by NOAA and UW, will lead the project.

Research plays vital role during relentless hurricane season

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In one of our nation’s most relentless hurricane seasons, NOAA research scientists were on the front lines of gathering key data used to help produce forecasts that saved lives and protected property. They also worked behind the scenes pushing the frontiers of weather forecasting skill in storm track, wind speeds and rainfall amounts by running and refining experimental forecast models for the future. And they tested new drones in air and water to assess their ability to gather data that can improve hurricane prediction. 

Scientific team selected to conduct independent abundance estimate of red snapper in Gulf of Mexico

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A team of university and government scientists, selected by an expert review panel convened by the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium, will conduct an independent study to estimate the number of red snapper in the U.S. waters of the Gulf of Mexico.

New 'atlas' reveals Earth's microscopic communities

Vast database can help advance innovation in agriculture, energy, health

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By Sierra Sarkis, NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

The planet is home to a vast number of microscopic living organisms - plants, animals, and bacteria- found from deep sea volcanoes to the highest mountain peaks. These organisms too small to be seen by the naked eye affect both human health and the health of the world’s ecosystems. Despite their centrality to life on Earth, scientists have a limited understanding of their fundamental structure. 


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