Saturday, March 24, 2018

Mike Walker

New research offers potential to predict atmospheric river activity up to 5 weeks ahead

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Those long, intense plumes of moisture in the sky known as atmospheric rivers are a vital water source to communities along the U.S. West Coast. In their absence, desiccating droughts can develop. But in their presence, they can cause extreme rain and floods that can disrupt travel, cause landslides, and trigger infrastructure failures.

Scientific team selected to conduct independent abundance estimate of red snapper in Gulf of Mexico

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A team of university and government scientists, selected by an expert review panel convened by the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium, will conduct an independent study to estimate the number of red snapper in the U.S. waters of the Gulf of Mexico.

NOAA Discovers and Explores Japanese Cargo Ship, Amakasu Maru, near Wake Atoll

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On August 11, NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer discovered and explored a Japanese cargo ship,  Amakasu Maru No.1, near Wake Atoll in the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. Using remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Deep Discoverer, the team visually documented the wreckage, the condition of the ship, and living communities growing on and around the site. The dive was streamed live on the Internet - via telepresence - for archaeologists and scientists to participate in the dive in real time and for the public to follow along live.

New study released: Sea Grant Research confirms scientific consensus on climate change

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Dr. Stuart Carlton is a social scientist with Texas Sea Grant. He works with Sea Grant extension agents to increase climate literacy among various stakeholder groups in Texas. “We want to help the public understand the effects of climate change, know there is a lot of good, credible science behind it, and ultimately develop real life, practical steps to adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change,” commented Carlton. 

New study: U.S. power plant emissions down

CIRES, NOAA scientists find switch to natural gas power plants means fewer air pollutants

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Power plants that use natural gas and a new technology to squeeze more energy from the fuel release far less of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide than coal-fired power plants do, according to a new analysis accepted for publication Jan. 8 in the journal Earth’s Future, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. The so-called “combined cycle” natural gas power plants also release significantly less nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide, which can worsen air quality.

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