Saturday, February 24, 2018
 

Scientists deploy autonomous sailing vessels to study whales, fish and...

Unmanned technologies open new frontier in ocean science

Monica.Allen 0 15309

NOAA Research and NOAA Fisheries have teamed up with academic and private sector partners to test innovative technologies that, if successful, will enable researchers to gather information on ocean conditions and marine species in remote areas of the ocean that are costly to reach and difficult to study.  

United States and Cuba open doors to marine science cooperation

President's trip to Cuba highlights cooperation on coral and fisheries science

Monica.Allen 0 15108
When Barack Obama becomes the first president to visit Cuba since Calvin Coolidge, his visit next week will highlight not only a new course in international relations, but showcase on-going scientific collaborations with the country only 90 miles off the Florida coast.

Warming ocean may bring major changes for U.S. northeast fish species

NOAA Fisheries and NOAA Research scientists collaborate on vulnerability assessment

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NOAA scientists have released the first multispecies assessment of just how vulnerable U.S. marine fish and invertebrate species are to the effects of climate change. The study examined 82 species that occur off the Northeastern U.S., where ocean warming is occurring rapidly.  Researchers found that most species evaluated will be affected, and that some are likely to be more resilient to changing ocean conditions than others. The study appears in PLOS ONE, an online scholarly science journal. 

Warming waters a major factor in Gulf of Maine cod collapse

New study shows how warming complicates fisheries management

Monica.Allen 0 18192

For centuries, cod was the backbone of New England’s fisheries and a key species in the Gulf of Maine ecosystem. Today, cod stocks in the gulf are on the verge of collapse, hovering at 3-4 percent of sustainable levels. Even setting tighter limits on fishing has failed to slow this rapid decline. Now a new

 report in Science concludes that rapid warming of Gulf of Maine waters— warming in the last decade faster than in 99 percent of the global ocean —has reduced the capacity of cod to rebound from overfishing, leading to collapse.

Sea Grant agent works with Arctic communities to study bowhead whales

Integrating science and cultural practices to tackle emerging issues

Monica.Allen 0 14683

In Alaska’s Bering Strait and Arctic regions, there are dozens of Alaskan Native tribes, many of whom depend on the marine environment for food, as they have in some cases for thousands of years.  In this world more foreign to most Americans than many other countries (and bigger than many too) works exactly one NOAA Oceanic & Atmospheric Research Sea Grant extension agent: Gay Sheffield.

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