Saturday, March 24, 2018

NOAA, Raytheon honored for flying unmanned aircraft to track hurricanes

Government, industry team receives Aviation Week Laureate Award

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The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Raytheon Company received Aviation Week magazine’s prestigious Laureate award for Defense Dual Use at Aviation Week’s 61st Annual Laureate Awards on March 1. The government/industry team was recognized for using the Raytheon Coyote® Unmanned Aircraft System to track and model hurricane behavior.

Research plays vital role during relentless hurricane season

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In one of our nation’s most relentless hurricane seasons, NOAA research scientists were on the front lines of gathering key data used to help produce forecasts that saved lives and protected property. They also worked behind the scenes pushing the frontiers of weather forecasting skill in storm track, wind speeds and rainfall amounts by running and refining experimental forecast models for the future. And they tested new drones in air and water to assess their ability to gather data that can improve hurricane prediction. 

NOAA begins transition of powerful new tool to improve hurricane forecasts

Superior physics will help revolutionize numerical weather prediction

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NOAA will begin using its newest weather prediction tool -- the dynamic core, Finite-Volume on a Cubed-Sphere (FV3), to provide high quality guidance to NOAA’s National Hurricane Center through the 2017 hurricane season.

Q&A: What do Arctic ice and Atlantic hurricanes have in common?

New research examines the North Atlantic Oscillation and its influence on global weather

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The journal Nature Geoscience published a paper by Tom Delworth and his colleagues examining how a natural atmospheric force--the North Atlantic Oscillation--may be changing ocean currents in the North Atlantic. Among other impacts, the stronger ocean currents increase the amount of heat flowing toward polar areas, which could speed up Arctic ice melt and affect how hurricanes form. We asked Delworth a few questions about his study: