Search

Stay Connected

NOAA Research News

NOAA organizes first agency-wide event to advance its modeling enterprise
MWalker
/ Categories: Climate, Ecosystems, Weather , 2018

NOAA organizes first agency-wide event to advance its modeling enterprise

NOAA constantly strives to improve its models of our changing environment in order to provide citizens, planners, emergency managers, and other decision makers with reliable information they can act on. But improving models takes time, money, and labor—tight budget constraints make this a challenging feat.

NOAA is leading the charge in the U.S. government to actively address this challenge by implementing a new strategy called unified modeling — a transparent and coordinated approach geared toward optimizing resources and enhancing outcomes. NOAA has begun acting on this strategy, and an upcoming agency-wide General Modeling Meeting and Fair serves as an important milestone in bringing together the modeling community to build on recent efforts.

“Addressing NOAA’s mission involves connecting modeling across various disciplines, based on new collaborations and partnerships,” said Annarita Mariotti, Director of the NOAA Research MAPP Program and Chair of the meeting’s Organizing Committee. “This is the purpose of this meeting.”

The meeting and fair’s theme is “interdisciplinary modeling and partnerships” with primary goals to enhance modeling communication and networking and to inform future activities of the NOAA Unified Modeling Committee

In January 2017, the Unified Modeling Committee published a white paper, the first systematic assessment of unified modeling for the government that identified six actionable topics to move forward with under a unified modeling strategy. One of these action items was to establish a “NOAA-wide process for information exchange,” and as a result, a sub-team led by Mariotti determined the need to organize this workshop regularly.

“The committee recognized early on that information exchange is a cost effective way to help connect the broad variety of NOAA modeling needs and activities,” said Mariotti. “While topical modeling meetings exist, there was no venue for the NOAA modeling enterprise to come together and discuss opportunities to connect existing activities.”

Jason Link, Senior Scientist for Ecosystems at NOAA Fisheries and co-Chair of the Unified Modeling Committee, noted that some of the protocols that the hurricane modelers have developed are just as appropriate for fish models or water models, and vice versa.

“Establishing a venue where all of NOAA’s modelers and our partners can share ideas seems like a win-win situation,” said Link.

Through keynote presentations, discussion sessions, booths, and modeling tutorials, this event will facilitate an exchange of best practices and a culture evolution across all of NOAA’s modeling enterprise, including the external community.

“Doing much more with our existing resources helps every aspect of NOAA’s mission,” said Hendrik Tolman, Senior Advisor for Advanced Modeling Systems at the National Weather Service and co-Chair of the Unified Modeling Committee, regarding the meeting. “Modeling enables NOAA to successfully execute its mission.”

Mariotti added that she hopes meeting participants will go home with a broader knowledge of who’s doing what kind of modeling at NOAA and some new ideas on what else they can do to extend what NOAA is able to do today.

The NOAA General Modeling Meeting and Fair takes place September 10-12 at the NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction in College Park, MD. Registration remains open through August 31st.

Register today and learn more in this General Modeling Meeting and Fair Flyer.

Previous Article High temperatures bring citizen scientists to map the hottest places in D.C. and Baltimore
Next Article NOAA funding research effort to develop global aerosol map
Print
4133

Documents to download

x

Popular Research News

NOAA science report highlights 2018 research accomplishments

NOAA science report highlights 2018 research accomplishments Read more

Forecasting hurricane track and intensity, providing decision support for wildfires, issuing warnings for harmful algal blooms: these are just a snapshot of how NOAA’s research over the past year has provided vital services to Americans every day. A newly released NOAA Science Report celebrates NOAA’s research and development, highlighting how NOAA’s research products impact the lives of all Americans.

Deep diving robots find warming accelerating in ocean off Antarctica

Deep diving robots find warming accelerating in ocean off Antarctica Read more

New research from NOAA and partners analyzing data from deep-diving ocean robots and research cruises shows that the coldest, near-bottom South Pacific waters originating from Antarctica are warming three times faster than they were in the 1990s. 

Global ocean is absorbing more carbon from emissions

Global ocean is absorbing more carbon from emissions Read more

New research by NOAA and partners based on extensive sampling of the global ocean finds that the ocean absorbed 34 billion metric tons of carbon from the burning of fossil fuels from 1994 to 2007 — a four-fold increase to 2.6 billion metric tons per year when compared to the period starting from the Industrial Revolution in 1800 to 1994.

This Earth Day, Explore the Ways NOAA Research is Tackling the Planet’s Biggest Questions

This Earth Day, Explore the Ways NOAA Research is Tackling the Planet’s Biggest Questions Read more

For scientists at NOAA, Earth Day — and every other day of the year — is about getting to the bottom of some of the most pressing questions about the planet we call home: how it works, how it’s changing, and how humans are affecting it.

Drone trains its eyes on flood waters to improve forecasts

Drone trains its eyes on flood waters to improve forecasts Read more

As the Yalobusha River rose around Greenwood, Mississippi, during a major rainstorm in late February, scientists from the Northern Gulf Institute at Mississippi State University deployed a small unmanned plane that took high-resolution images of rising waters and beamed them back in real time to NOAA weather forecasters.

RSS
«May 2019»
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
2829301234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930311
2345678

Oar Headquarters

Phone: 301-713-2458
Address: 1315 East-West Highway Silver Spring, MD 20910

Stay Connected

About Us

Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

Contact Us

Can't Find What You Need?
Send Feedback
Back To Top