Thursday, March 23, 2017
 
New study: Sea ice loss likely no factor in cold Northern Hemisphere winters

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

New study: Sea ice loss likely no factor in cold Northern Hemisphere winters

The rapid loss of Arctic sea ice is a major driver of the warming trend sweeping across the Arctic in recent  years, but melting sea ice is probably not behind recent cold winters in parts of Europe, Asia, and the United States, according to a new NOAA study.
Arctic set for record-breaking melt this summer

Friday, May 20, 2016

Arctic set for record-breaking melt this summer

The record heat baking Alaska is poised to smash a host of climate records in 2016, including the earliest snowmelt date at NOAA’s Barrow Observatory, the northernmost point in the nation.


Warming due to carbon dioxide jumped by half in 25 years

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Warming due to carbon dioxide jumped by half in 25 years

Human activity  has increased the direct warming effect of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere by 50 percent above pre-industrial levels during the past 25 years, according to NOAA's 10th Annual Greenhouse Gas Index .


North Dakota’s Bakken oil and gas field leaking 275,000 tons of methane per year

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

North Dakota’s Bakken oil and gas field leaking 275,000 tons of methane per year

The Bakken oil and gas field is leaking a lot of methane, but less than some satellites report, and less than the latest Environmental Protection Agency inventory for petroleum systems, according to the researchers’ calculations. That's the finding of the first field study measuring emissions of this potent greenhouse gas from the Bakken, which spans parts of North Dakota and Montana. The work was published today in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres

Leftover warm water in Pacific Ocean fueled massive El Niño

Monday, May 9, 2016

Leftover warm water in Pacific Ocean fueled massive El Niño

Editor's note: The American Geophysical Union wrote the following release on new NOAA research publishing in Geophysical Research Letters.

A new study by NOAA's Aaron Levine and Michael Mcphaden provides insight into how the current El Niño, one of the strongest on record, formed in the Pacific Ocean. The new research finds easterly winds in the tropical Pacific Ocean stalled a potential El Niño in 2014 and left a swath of warm water in the central Pacific. The presence of that warm water stacked the deck for a monster El Niño to occur in 2015, according to the study’s authors.

Will droughts turn the Amazon into a giant source of carbon emissions?

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Will droughts turn the Amazon into a giant source of carbon emissions?

As climate change increases temperatures and alters rainfall patterns across South America, scientists are concerned that the Amazon rainforest will shift from a carbon sponge to a carbon source.


Flying high to measure gravity: humans optional

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Flying high to measure gravity: humans optional

NOAA's Unmanned Aircraft Systems Program worked through NOAA's Small Business Innovation Research Program  to test an unmanned aircraft system for gravity measurements. SBIR funds high-risk, high-reward projects that not only help NOAA to meet its mission, but open up new markets for industry. 

Measuring variations in gravity helps scientists create a height measurement system based on where water will flow. These measurements will help prepare for floods, sea level rise, and other emergencies, making our coastal communities more resilient, and aid a number of diverse industries such as agriculture, construction, transportation, and urban planning.

Extensive coral communities found in Alaska's Glacier Bay National Park

Thursday, April 21, 2016

Extensive coral communities found in Alaska's Glacier Bay National Park

On a recent research expedition in Alaska, scientists aboard the R/V Norseman IIconducted the first-ever deepwater exploration of Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. Using both surveys by scuba divers and the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Kraken2, scientists found an abundance of cold-water corals and associated organisms that use these corals as habitat, from the very bottom to the top of the submerged portion of the fjords. Prior to the expedition, little was known about ecosystems in the depths of the fjord and records of corals were sparse. 
NOAA names new leader for NOAA's National Sea Grant College Program

Thursday, April 21, 2016

NOAA names new leader for NOAA's National Sea Grant College Program

NOAA today announced that Jonathan R. Pennock, Ph.D., the director of New Hampshire Sea Grant and a longtime coastal scientist, will be the new leader of NOAA’s National Sea Grant College Program.


New study released: Sea Grant Research confirms scientific consensus on climate change

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

New study released: Sea Grant Research confirms scientific consensus on climate change

Dr. Stuart Carlton is a social scientist with Texas Sea Grant. He works with Sea Grant extension agents to increase climate literacy among various stakeholder groups in Texas. “We want to help the public understand the effects of climate change, know there is a lot of good, credible science behind it, and ultimately develop real life, practical steps to adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change,” commented Carlton. 
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