Tuesday, November 21, 2017
 
NASA Global Hawk arrives in Virginia to begin NOAA-led mission to improve hurricane forecasts

Monday, August 24, 2015

NASA Global Hawk arrives in Virginia to begin NOAA-led mission to improve hurricane forecasts

With the August 22 arrival of the NASA Global Hawk unmanned aircraft on Virginia’s eastern shore, scientists and pilots are now ready to start the NOAA-led mission to improve hurricane forecasts of track and intensity using data collected by the Global Hawk during the season’s hurricanes.

 

 

Research to measure cost of climate change,  improve prediction of severe weather

Monday, August 17, 2015

Research to measure cost of climate change, improve prediction of severe weather

NOAA researchers team up with partners on economic and other climate research

New research appearing online today in the journal Nature Climate Change by NOAA and partners forecasts the effects of climate change on countries' economic output and suggests that rising greenhouse gases may contribute to more extreme El Niños, the climate phenomenon that can trigger severe weather. 

Volcano spewing carbon dioxide drives coral to give way to algae

Monday, August 10, 2015

Volcano spewing carbon dioxide drives coral to give way to algae

New research provides early warning of ocean acidification effects

Scientists from NOAA and the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies at the University of Miami have documented a dramatic shift from vibrant coral communities to carpets of algae in remote Pacific Ocean waters where an underwater volcano spews carbon dioxide.

Public invited to join NOAA on deep sea expedition of Pacific marine protected areas

Thursday, July 30, 2015

Public invited to join NOAA on deep sea expedition of Pacific marine protected areas

From Aug. 1 to Sept. 29, public can explore deep sea habitats and marine life with scientists and researchers

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer will begin two months of dives using unmanned remotely operated vehicles, or ROVs, to explore marine protected areas in the central Pacific Ocean. Starting on Aug. 1, anyone with an internet connection can virtually explore the deep sea with scientists and researchers from their computer or mobile device.

Stratosphere an Accomplice for Santa Ana Winds and California Wildfires

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

Stratosphere an Accomplice for Santa Ana Winds and California Wildfires

The hot and dry Santa Ana winds are associated with many of Southern California’s destructive wildfires, and even take the blame for tense, ugly moods. Now, NOAA researchers have found that on occasion the winds have an accomplice in contributing to California’s wildfires: atmospheric events known as stratospheric intrusions, which bring extremely dry air from the upper atmosphere down to the surface.

Monitoring seawater reveals ocean acidification risks to  Alaskan shellfish hatchery

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Monitoring seawater reveals ocean acidification risks to Alaskan shellfish hatchery

NOAA, University of Alaska collaborate with shellfish hatchery

New collaborative research between NOAA, University of Alaska and an Alaskan shellfish hatchery shows that ocean acidification may make it difficult for Alaskan coastal waters to support shellfish hatcheries by 2040 unless costly mitigation efforts are installed to modify seawater used in the hatcheries.

Nationwide study measures short-term spike in particulate matter due to Independence Day fireworks

Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Nationwide study measures short-term spike in particulate matter due to Independence Day fireworks

Particulate matter linked to short and long-term health effects

From our nation’s founding, the Fourth of July has been synonymous with fireworks. While many grew up learning that fireworks can be dangerous to the eyes and hands if not handled properly, fireworks also produce air pollutants, including particulate matter, that are linked to short-term or long-term health effects.

NOAA has authored a new study appearing in the journal Atmospheric Environment that quantifies the surge in fine particulate matter – particles that are two and one half microns in diameter (PM2.5) – on July 4, using observations from the 315 U.S. air quality monitoring sites that operated from 1999 to 2013. The new study is the first nationwide quantitative analysis of the effects.

New study shows Arctic Ocean rapidly becoming more corrosive to marine species

Monday, June 15, 2015

New study shows Arctic Ocean rapidly becoming more corrosive to marine species

Chukchi and Beaufort Seas could become less hospitable to shelled animals by 2030

New research by NOAA, University of Alaska, and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the journal Oceanography shows that surface waters of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas could reach levels of acidity that threaten the ability of animals to build and maintain their shells by 2030, with the Bering Sea reaching this level of acidity by 2044.

Sailing for scientific success in the Bering Sea

Friday, June 5, 2015

Sailing for scientific success in the Bering Sea

PMEL Saildrones successfully complete first test mission in cold waters

Testing new scientific technology is a risky business. In the case of two Saildrones released in the eastern Bering Sea over a month ago, the risk has led to big rewards. Equipped with a suite of scientific sensors, the unmanned surface vehicles are performing beyond researchers’ expectations during their first test run in cold waters. Each Saildrone has collected over 40 million measurements over the course of the planned 2.5 month test mission.

Stricter limits for ozone pollution would boost need for science, measurements

Thursday, June 4, 2015

Stricter limits for ozone pollution would boost need for science, measurements

A tougher federal standard for ozone pollution, under consideration to improve public health, would ramp up the importance of scientific measurements and models, according to a new commentary published in the June 5 edition of Science by researchers at NOAA and its cooperative institute at the University of Colorado Boulder.

The commentary, led by Owen Cooper of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory, looks at how a new, stricter ozone standard would pose challenges for air quality managers at state and local levels. Last November, the Environmental Protection Agency proposed lowering the primary ozone standard from 75 parts per billion (ppb) to 70 or 65 ppb, based on ozone’s known effects on children, the elderly, and people who have lung diseases such as asthma. A decision by the EPA administrator is expected in October 2015.

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