Saturday, October 21, 2017
 
HFC greenhouse gases: a tale of two (or more) futures

Tuesday, November 3, 2015

HFC greenhouse gases: a tale of two (or more) futures

New research projects greenhouse effect from substances that replaced ozone-depleting products

new paper appearing online in Atmospheric Environment  coauthored by researchers at NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory looked at the climate implications of various proposals for future HFC use that are being discussed this week under the United Nations Montreal Protocol, the global agreement that protects the ozone layer. 
Annual Antarctic ozone hole larger and formed later in 2015

Thursday, October 29, 2015

Annual Antarctic ozone hole larger and formed later in 2015

The 2015 Antarctic ozone hole area was larger and formed later than in recent years, according to scientists from NOAA and NASA.

On Oct. 2, 2015, the ozone hole expanded to its peak of 28.2 million square kilometers (10.9 million square miles), an area larger than the continent of North America. Throughout October, the hole remained large and set many area daily records.

Warming waters a major factor in Gulf of Maine cod collapse

Thursday, October 29, 2015

Warming waters a major factor in Gulf of Maine cod collapse

New study shows how warming complicates fisheries management

For centuries, cod was the backbone of New England’s fisheries and a key species in the Gulf of Maine ecosystem. Today, cod stocks in the gulf are on the verge of collapse, hovering at 3-4 percent of sustainable levels. Even setting tighter limits on fishing has failed to slow this rapid decline. Now a new

 report in Science concludes that rapid warming of Gulf of Maine waters— warming in the last decade faster than in 99 percent of the global ocean —has reduced the capacity of cod to rebound from overfishing, leading to collapse.
NOAA’s Ko Barrett elected vice chair of international climate science panel

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

NOAA’s Ko Barrett elected vice chair of international climate science panel

Ko Barrett (left) joins Youba Sokana of Mali and Thelma Krug as IPCC vice chairs

The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) elected NOAA’s Ko Barrett to serve as one of three vice chairs for the international body. The IPCC was created to review and assess the most recent scientific, technical, and socio-economic information produced worldwide that is relevant to the understanding of climate change. 

NOAA-led research identifies areas of global ocean  most vulnerable to ocean acidification

Tuesday, October 13, 2015

NOAA-led research identifies areas of global ocean most vulnerable to ocean acidification

New NOAA-led research maps the distribution of aragonite saturation state in both surface and subsurface waters of the global ocean and provides further evidence that ocean acidification is happening on a global scale. The study identifies the Arctic and Antarctic oceans, and the upwelling ocean waters off the west coasts of North America, South America and Africa as regions that are especially vulnerable to ocean acidification.
NOAA awards $48 million to advance climate research, improve community resilience

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

NOAA awards $48 million to advance climate research, improve community resilience

NOAA’s Climate Program Office (CPO) today announced it has awarded $48 million for 53 new projects. Research will be conducted by NOAA laboratories and operational centers, universities, and other agency and research partners to advance the understanding, modeling, and prediction of Earth’s climate system and to improve decision making. 

Tracking harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Tracking harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie

Experimental forecasting tool aids local managers

As part of efforts to enhance its Experimental Lake Erie Harmful Algal Bloom Bulletin, NOAA is offering the HAB Tracker, a new experimental forecasting tool that aims to aid local managers in decision-making on harmful algal blooms (HABs). The experimental tool is available online on NOAA’s Great Lakes Environmental Laboratory (GLERL) website, and incorporates real-time data with modelling to produce daily an updated 5-day forecast of potential bloom distribution and movement.
Scientists find Southern Ocean removing CO2 from the atmosphere more efficiently

Thursday, September 10, 2015

Scientists find Southern Ocean removing CO2 from the atmosphere more efficiently

CIRES-CU-NOAA led research team compile densest carbon data set in Antarctic waters

Since 2002, the Southern Ocean has been removing more of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2from the atmosphere, according to two new studies. These studies, out today in the journals Geophysical Research Letters (GRL)and Science, make use of millions of ship-based observations and a variety of data analysis techniques to conclude that the Southern Ocean has increasingly taken up more CO2 during the last 13 years. That follows a decade from the early 1990s to 2000s, where evidence suggested the Southern Ocean CO2 sink was weakening.
New NOAA-led study measures soot from North Dakota  flaring in oil and gas fields

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

New NOAA-led study measures soot from North Dakota flaring in oil and gas fields

Flaring produces an estimated 4 tons of black carbon per day, not considered significant for climate

In the lonely reaches of northwestern North Dakota and across the border into Saskatchewan, the vast Bakken oil field hosts extensive activities to extract both crude oil and natural gas. Business is booming—production increased by 30 percent between May 2013 and May 2014. More than a quarter of the total gas produced from the Bakken operations can’t be processed fast enough, though, and the common industry practice is to flare it—burn it off as it is vented to the atmosphere. Jutting 30 feet upward like enormous lit matchsticks, the flares pose a new question for atmospheric scientists: What do the flares put into the air? A new NOAA-led study has produced the first direct measurements of how much black carbon—a major component of airborne particles that are commonly referred to as soot —is emitted by the Bakken flaring operations.

NOAA's Science On a Sphere® animations coming to your desktop

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

NOAA's Science On a Sphere® animations coming to your desktop

NOAA releases free downloadable flat screen program, great for students, teachers and science lovers

(September 1) Today NOAA released a free, downloadable flat screen version of its popular Science On a Sphere® (SOS), SOS ExplorerTM. This new way to display the dynamics of Earth’s weather and climate, plate tectonics and more will help teachers bring these stunning science visualizations, usually found at museums and science centers, into the classroom, where students can learn by exploring.


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