Friday, December 15, 2017
 

NOAA and partner scientists study ocean acidification in Prince William...

New unmanned tools used to track effects of melting glaciers

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Scientists from NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, the University of Alaska and the Alaska Ocean Observing System are teaming up this summer and early fall to use new unmanned tools to study how melting glaciers in Alaska’s Prince William Sound may be intensifying ocean acidification in the sound and on the Gulf of Alaska continental shelf. 

NOAA-led researchers discover ocean acidity is dissolving shells of...

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A NOAA-led research team has found the first evidence that acidity of continental shelf waters off the West Coast is dissolving the shells of tiny free-swimming marine snails, called pteropods, which provide food for pink salmon, mackerel and herring, according to a new paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

NOAA and partners release first federal ocean acidification strategic...

Interagency Working Group on Ocean Acidification outlines multi-disciplinary research on impacts

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Today, NOAA and its partners released the first federal strategic plan to guide research and monitoring investments that will improve our understanding of ocean acidification, its potential impacts on marine species and ecosystems, and adaptation and mitigation strategies.

Carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean is increasing faster than...

Ocean acidity is also rising rapidly

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New NOAA research has revealed unprecedented changes in ocean carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean over the last 14 years, influencing the role the oceans play in current and projected global warming and ocean acidification. Natural variability has dominated patterns in ocean CO2 in this region, but observations now show human activity contributes to increasing CO2 levels.

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