Thursday, December 14, 2017
 

New study released: Sea Grant Research confirms scientific consensus on...

Mike Walker 0 0 Article rating: No rating
Dr. Stuart Carlton is a social scientist with Texas Sea Grant. He works with Sea Grant extension agents to increase climate literacy among various stakeholder groups in Texas. “We want to help the public understand the effects of climate change, know there is a lot of good, credible science behind it, and ultimately develop real life, practical steps to adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change,” commented Carlton. 

Water Resources Dashboard provides “one-stop shop” for water data needs

New tool helps communities become more resilient to water hazards and threats

Monica.Allen 0 9383 Article rating: No rating

All regions and economic sectors in the United States depend on adequate and reliable water supplies. Too much or too little water can endanger the health and welfare of citizens and businesses. Driven by feedback from water resource managers, federal agencies and others, NOAA and partners have developed the Water Resources Dashboard: a one-stop website for relevant water data on drought, flooding, precipitation, climate and other measures. 

United States and Cuba open doors to marine science cooperation

President's trip to Cuba highlights cooperation on coral and fisheries science

Monica.Allen 0 14475 Article rating: No rating
When Barack Obama becomes the first president to visit Cuba since Calvin Coolidge, his visit next week will highlight not only a new course in international relations, but showcase on-going scientific collaborations with the country only 90 miles off the Florida coast.

Warming ocean may bring major changes for U.S. northeast fish species

NOAA Fisheries and NOAA Research scientists collaborate on vulnerability assessment

Monica.Allen 0 10179 Article rating: No rating
NOAA scientists have released the first multispecies assessment of just how vulnerable U.S. marine fish and invertebrate species are to the effects of climate change. The study examined 82 species that occur off the Northeastern U.S., where ocean warming is occurring rapidly.  Researchers found that most species evaluated will be affected, and that some are likely to be more resilient to changing ocean conditions than others. The study appears in PLOS ONE, an online scholarly science journal. 
12345678910Last