Thursday, December 14, 2017
 

NOAA-led researchers discover ocean acidity is dissolving shells of...

Monica.Allen 0 17401 Article rating: No rating
A NOAA-led research team has found the first evidence that acidity of continental shelf waters off the West Coast is dissolving the shells of tiny free-swimming marine snails, called pteropods, which provide food for pink salmon, mackerel and herring, according to a new paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

NOAA and partners release first federal ocean acidification strategic...

Interagency Working Group on Ocean Acidification outlines multi-disciplinary research on impacts

Monica.Allen 0 23751 Article rating: No rating

Today, NOAA and its partners released the first federal strategic plan to guide research and monitoring investments that will improve our understanding of ocean acidification, its potential impacts on marine species and ecosystems, and adaptation and mitigation strategies.

Carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean is increasing faster than...

Ocean acidity is also rising rapidly

Monica.Allen 0 29465 Article rating: No rating

New NOAA research has revealed unprecedented changes in ocean carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean over the last 14 years, influencing the role the oceans play in current and projected global warming and ocean acidification. Natural variability has dominated patterns in ocean CO2 in this region, but observations now show human activity contributes to increasing CO2 levels.

$2 million Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPRIZE Launched

john.ewald 0 20210 Article rating: No rating
XPRIZE (www.xprize.org), the global leader in incentivized prize competitions, announced the launch of its next major competition: the $2 million Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPRIZE. The Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPRIZE aims to spur global innovators to develop accurate and affordable ocean pH sensors that will ultimately transform our understanding of ocean acidification.

A more acidic Arctic? NOAA deploys first buoy in region to monitor...

john.ewald 0 31963 Article rating: No rating
NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in partnership with the Marine Research Institute in Iceland deployed the first high-latitude ocean acidification monitoring buoy in the Atlantic Ocean in early August.  The moored buoy is the first of its kind to be deployed north of the Arctic circle in a region where very little is known about how carbon dioxide (CO2) is entering the ocean environment. 
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