Thursday, December 14, 2017
 

New mission for the Global Hawk

NOAA is testing data collected by unmanned aircraft to improve weather forecast operations

Monica.Allen 0 26953 Article rating: No rating

For the last five years, NOAA has teamed up with NASA to fly NASA’s Global Hawk unmanned aircraft to get an inside look at how hurricanes form and intensify over the Atlantic. The NASA-led project called the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel mission is demonstrating the ability of the Global Hawk to fly over hurricanes to gather continuous weather data on flights that are longer in duration than possible with manned aircraft. In the next three years, NOAA will take the next step with the Global Hawk, leading a new experiment and continuing its important collaboration with NASA. Drawing on technology and expertise honed in the current mission, NOAA will assess the feasibility of regular operations of Global Hawk to improve day-to-day forecasts of severe storms forming over the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic oceans.

NOAA Researchers Contribute to The 3rd National Climate Assessment...

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We spoke with NOAA Research’s three contributing authors to the U.S. Global Change Research Program’s 3rd National Climate Assessment (NCA) released May 6, 2014 to understand their contribution to the NCA. According to the U.S. Global Change Research Program, the 3rd NCA is a compilation of scientific information on climate change from multiple sources and institutions and is a valuable resource in communicating and understanding climate change science and the impacts of climate change on the United States. The NCA will be used by federal scientists and managers, U.S. communities and citizens, and commercial businesses to improve environmental sustainability.

Earth is breathing deeper: Multi-agency study reveals widening seasonal...

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Levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere rise and fall annually as plants take up the gas in spring and summer and release it in fall and winter through photosynthesis and respiration. Now the range of that cycle is growing as more CO2 is emitted from the burning of fossil fuels and other human activities, according to a study published in Science by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, with CIRES and NOAA co-authors.

CIRES, NOAA observe significant methane leaks in a Utah natural gas field

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On a perfect winter day in Utah’s Uintah County in 2012, CIRES scientists and NOAA colleagues tested out a new way to measure methane emissions from a natural gas production field. Their results, accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters, constitute a proof-of-concept that could help both researchers and regulators better determine how much of the greenhouse gas and other air pollutants leak from oil and gas fields. 

Greenhouse gases continue climbing; 2012 a record year

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NOAA’s updated Annual Greenhouse Gas Index (AGGI), which measures the direct climate influence of many heat-trapping gases like carbon dioxide and methane, shows 2012 continued the steady upward trend that began with the Industrial Revolution of the 1880s.  Last year, CO2 at the peak of its cycle reached 400 ppm for one month at all eight Arctic sites for the first time.
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