Tuesday, December 12, 2017
 

Volcano spewing carbon dioxide drives coral to give way to algae

New research provides early warning of ocean acidification effects

Monica.Allen 0 22774 Article rating: No rating

Scientists from NOAA and the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies at the University of Miami have documented a dramatic shift from vibrant coral communities to carpets of algae in remote Pacific Ocean waters where an underwater volcano spews carbon dioxide.

Monitoring seawater reveals ocean acidification risks to Alaskan...

NOAA, University of Alaska collaborate with shellfish hatchery

Monica.Allen 0 13944 Article rating: No rating

New collaborative research between NOAA, University of Alaska and an Alaskan shellfish hatchery shows that ocean acidification may make it difficult for Alaskan coastal waters to support shellfish hatcheries by 2040 unless costly mitigation efforts are installed to modify seawater used in the hatcheries.

New study shows Arctic Ocean rapidly becoming more corrosive to marine...

Chukchi and Beaufort Seas could become less hospitable to shelled animals by 2030

Monica.Allen 0 26298 Article rating: No rating

New research by NOAA, University of Alaska, and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the journal Oceanography shows that surface waters of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas could reach levels of acidity that threaten the ability of animals to build and maintain their shells by 2030, with the Bering Sea reaching this level of acidity by 2044.

NOAA Scientists Provide Expertise for the $2 Million Wendy Schmidt...

Monica.Allen 0 10229 Article rating: No rating
We caught up recently with Remy Okazaki at NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle.  Remy is a chemist with the University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean (JISAO) working with PMEL’s carbon team on the $2 million Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPRIZE, a global competition to advance ocean pH sensing technology to better understand, measure and address ocean acidification. On May 14, XPRIZE will begin the final phase of testing in deep water off the northern coast of Oahu, Hawaii, aboard the R/V Kilo Moana research vessel.

NOAA to explore depths of Caribbean Sea

Public can watch seafloor discoveries live online from April 10 to 30

Monica.Allen 0 22109 Article rating: No rating

Beginning April 10, scientists aboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer will begin a series of 20 dives to investigate previously unseen depths of the Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean – and the public can follow along online.

During dives that are expected to go as deep as 3.7 miles, a sophisticated unmanned submarine, called a remotely operated vehicle, or ROV, will broadcast live video from the seafloor, allowing anyone with Internet access to watch the expedition as it unfolds.

12345678