Friday, October 20, 2017
 

NOAA and partner scientists study ocean acidification in Prince William...

New unmanned tools used to track effects of melting glaciers

Monica.Allen 0 37116 Article rating: No rating

Scientists from NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, the University of Alaska and the Alaska Ocean Observing System are teaming up this summer and early fall to use new unmanned tools to study how melting glaciers in Alaska’s Prince William Sound may be intensifying ocean acidification in the sound and on the Gulf of Alaska continental shelf. 

Carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean is increasing faster than...

Ocean acidity is also rising rapidly

Monica.Allen 0 27923 Article rating: No rating

New NOAA research has revealed unprecedented changes in ocean carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean over the last 14 years, influencing the role the oceans play in current and projected global warming and ocean acidification. Natural variability has dominated patterns in ocean CO2 in this region, but observations now show human activity contributes to increasing CO2 levels.

Earth is breathing deeper: Multi-agency study reveals widening seasonal...

john.ewald 0 17539 Article rating: No rating
Levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere rise and fall annually as plants take up the gas in spring and summer and release it in fall and winter through photosynthesis and respiration. Now the range of that cycle is growing as more CO2 is emitted from the burning of fossil fuels and other human activities, according to a study published in Science by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, with CIRES and NOAA co-authors.

NOAA, partners: Earth’s oceans and ecosystems still absorbing about...

Anonym 0 22547 Article rating: No rating

Earth’s oceans, forests and other ecosystems continue to soak up about half the carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere by human activities, even as those emissions have increased, according to a study by University of Colorado and NOAA scientists published today in the journal Nature.

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