Monday, December 11, 2017
 

No ice to break

Dispatches from the Arctic

Monica.Allen 0 1699 Article rating: 2.5

Editor’s note: This is the second dispatch from Jeremy Mathis, director of NOAA’s Arctic Research Program, who is leading a team of NOAA scientists on a research cruise in the Arctic.

Why We Go North

Dispatches from the Arctic

Monica.Allen 0 2074 Article rating: 5.0

This blog post by Jeremy Mathis, director of NOAA's Arctic Research Program, is the first in a series of posts from NOAA scientists aboard US Coast Guard Cutter Healy who are measuring Arctic environmental change.

Summer of sailing drones

Unmanned ocean vehicles are collecting data from the Arctic to the tropics

Monica.Allen 0 6679 Article rating: No rating

Over the next four months, NOAA scientists will launch unmanned ocean vehicles, called Saildrones, from the Arctic to the tropical Pacific Ocean to help better understand how changes in the ocean are affecting weather, climate, fisheries and marine mammals. The wind and solar-powered research vehicles that resemble a sailboat will travel thousands of miles across the ocean, reaching some areas never before surveyed with such specialized technology. 

Agencies team up to accelerate Earth system prediction

Goal is improved short and long-term prediction of weather, climate, ocean and sea ice conditions

Monica.Allen 0 7289 Article rating: No rating
Accurately predicting the weather - at short and long time scales - is among the most complex and important challenges faced by science. Protecting the nation’s security and economic well-being will increasingly rely on improved skill in forecasting weather, weather-driven events like floods and droughts, and long-term shifts in weather, ocean and sea-ice patterns.

Research shows ocean acidification is spreading rapidly in the Arctic

Communities dependent on shellfish, other marine resources could be at risk

Monica.Allen 0 13315 Article rating: No rating

Ocean acidification is spreading rapidly in the western Arctic Ocean in both area and depth, potentially affecting shellfish, other marine species in the food web, and communities that depend on these resources, according to new research published in Nature Climate Change by NOAA, Chinese marine scientists and other partners.


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