Monday, December 11, 2017
 

NOAA’s Ko Barrett elected vice chair of international climate science panel

Ko Barrett (left) joins Youba Sokana of Mali and Thelma Krug as IPCC vice chairs

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The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) elected NOAA’s Ko Barrett to serve as one of three vice chairs for the international body. The IPCC was created to review and assess the most recent scientific, technical, and socio-economic information produced worldwide that is relevant to the understanding of climate change. 

NOAA-led research identifies areas of global ocean most vulnerable to...

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New NOAA-led research maps the distribution of aragonite saturation state in both surface and subsurface waters of the global ocean and provides further evidence that ocean acidification is happening on a global scale. The study identifies the Arctic and Antarctic oceans, and the upwelling ocean waters off the west coasts of North America, South America and Africa as regions that are especially vulnerable to ocean acidification.

NOAA awards $48 million to advance climate research, improve community...

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NOAA’s Climate Program Office (CPO) today announced it has awarded $48 million for 53 new projects. Research will be conducted by NOAA laboratories and operational centers, universities, and other agency and research partners to advance the understanding, modeling, and prediction of Earth’s climate system and to improve decision making. 

Tracking harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie

Experimental forecasting tool aids local managers

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As part of efforts to enhance its Experimental Lake Erie Harmful Algal Bloom Bulletin, NOAA is offering the HAB Tracker, a new experimental forecasting tool that aims to aid local managers in decision-making on harmful algal blooms (HABs). The experimental tool is available online on NOAA’s Great Lakes Environmental Laboratory (GLERL) website, and incorporates real-time data with modelling to produce daily an updated 5-day forecast of potential bloom distribution and movement.

Scientists find Southern Ocean removing CO2 from the atmosphere more...

CIRES-CU-NOAA led research team compile densest carbon data set in Antarctic waters

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Since 2002, the Southern Ocean has been removing more of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2from the atmosphere, according to two new studies. These studies, out today in the journals Geophysical Research Letters (GRL)and Science, make use of millions of ship-based observations and a variety of data analysis techniques to conclude that the Southern Ocean has increasingly taken up more CO2 during the last 13 years. That follows a decade from the early 1990s to 2000s, where evidence suggested the Southern Ocean CO2 sink was weakening.
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