Friday, December 15, 2017
 

Researchers offer new insights into predicting future droughts in...

Natural cycles, sea surface temperatures found to be main drivers in ongoing event

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According to a new NOAA-sponsored study, natural oceanic and atmospheric patterns are the primary drivers behind California's ongoing drought. A high pressure ridge off the West Coast (typical of historic droughts) prevailed for three winters, blocking important wet season storms, with ocean surface temperature patterns making such a ridge much more likely. Typically, the winter season in California provides the state with a majority of its annual snow and rainfall that replenish water supplies for communities and ecosystems.

NOAA scientists to share research and resiliency tools at international...

Presentations by Amanda McCarty and Libby Jewett to be web-streamed live from Lima, Peru

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Several NOAA scientists will present information on climate research and new tools to build greater resiliency to climate change at a meeting on the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Lima, Peru, that will run from December 1-12.

NOAA Sea Grant Awards $15.9 million for projects to build resilient...

Federal grants leverage $7.9 million nonfederal match, for total of $23.8 million

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NOAA Sea Grant announced today grants totaling $15.9 million to support over 300 projects around the nation that help build resilient coastal communities and economies. Through university, state and other partnerships, Sea Grant Programs will supplement the federal funding with an additional $7.9 million in non-federal matching funds, bringing the total investment to more than $23.8 million.

 

NOAA flies over Arctic to measure extent of sea ice

Annual fall mission helps gauge climate change in Arctic

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NOAA researchers set out this week on a two-week mission to fly over the Arctic to measure how much the ice has melted over the summer and gauge the speed of this fall’s refreezing of sea ice. This is the second year in a row scientists have flown above Arctic waters.  Data gathered from both years is testing a hypothesis that increased summer heat stored in the newly sea-ice free areas of the Arctic Ocean lead to surface heat fluxes in autumn that are large enough to have impacts on atmospheric temperature, humidity, wind and cloud distributions. 

Climate change not to blame for 2013 Colorado floods

Heavy multi-day summer rain events not expected to increase in the area

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Last September’s widespread flooding in northeast Colorado, which saw just over 17 inches of rain in one week in the city of Boulder, was not made more likely or more intense by the effects of human-induced climate change, according to a new NOAA-led study published today in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

 

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