Tuesday, October 17, 2017
 

NOAA begins transition of powerful new tool to improve hurricane forecasts

Superior physics will help revolutionize numerical weather prediction

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NOAA will begin using its newest weather prediction tool -- the dynamic core, Finite-Volume on a Cubed-Sphere (FV3), to provide high quality guidance to NOAA’s National Hurricane Center through the 2017 hurricane season.

Meet Désirée Tommasi: Pioneer in new field of fish forecasting

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Long known for weather forecasting and climate prediction, NOAA is pioneering a new type of forecasting -- fish forecasting.  Meet Désirée Tommasi, Ph.D., a young oceanographer working at  NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory in Princeton, N.J. who has just published research about forecasting the Pacific sardine, one of the nation’s most storied fish, made famous by John Steinbeck’s Cannery Row.

Climate change increased chances of record rains in Louisiana by at...

NOAA and partners conduct rapid assessment of devastating August rains

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Human-caused climate warming increased the chances of the torrential rains that unleashed devastating floods in south Louisiana in mid August by at least 40 percent, according to a team of NOAA and partner scientists with World Weather Attribution (WWA) who conducted a rapid assessment of the role of climate on the historic heavy rain event. 

Stratosphere an Accomplice for Santa Ana Winds and California Wildfires

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The hot and dry Santa Ana winds are associated with many of Southern California’s destructive wildfires, and even take the blame for tense, ugly moods. Now, NOAA researchers have found that on occasion the winds have an accomplice in contributing to California’s wildfires: atmospheric events known as stratospheric intrusions, which bring extremely dry air from the upper atmosphere down to the surface.

Sea level spiked for two years from New York to Newfoundland

University of Arizona scientists collaborate with NOAA scientists, using NOAA climate models

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Sea levels from New York to Newfoundland jumped up about four inches in 2009 and 2010 because ocean circulation changed, a University of Arizona-led team, in collaboration with NOAA scientists, reports in an upcoming issue of Nature Communications
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